tm223567-1_def14a - none - 12.4688067s
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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Amendment No.       )
Filed by the Registrant   ☒
Filed by a party other than the Registrant   ☐
Check the appropriate box:

Preliminary Proxy Statement

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

Definitive Proxy Statement

Definitive Additional Materials

Soliciting Material under § 240.14a-12
PROGYNY, INC.
(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)
(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if Other Than the Registrant)
Payment of Filing Fee (Check all boxes that apply)

No fee required

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials

Fee computed on table in exhibit required by Item 25(b) per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11

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PROGYNY, INC.
1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor
New York, New York 10018
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
To Be Held Virtually at https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/n28rff8k On May 25, 2022
To the Stockholders of Progyny, Inc.:
On behalf of our board of directors, you are cordially invited to attend the Annual Meeting of Stockholders of Progyny, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Company”). The Annual Meeting will be held virtually, via live webcast at https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/n28rff8k, originating from New York, New York, on Wednesday, May 25, 2022 at 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Similar to last year, we have determined to hold a virtual Annual Meeting this year in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, as we believe ensuring the safety of our communities, stockholders and personnel is critical at this time. Stockholders attending the virtual meeting will be afforded the same rights and opportunities to participate as they would at an in-person meeting. We encourage you to attend online and participate. We recommend that you log in a few minutes prior to the start of the Annual Meeting on May 25, 2022 to ensure you are logged in when the Annual Meeting starts.
The Annual Meeting will be held for the following purposes:
1.
To elect three Class III directors, Dr. Fred Cohen, Dr. Norman Payson and Dr. Beth Seidenberg, each to hold office until our Annual Meeting of Stockholders in 2025;
2.
To ratify the selection by the audit committee of our board of directors of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022;
3.
To approve, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, the compensation of our named executive officers; and
4.
To conduct any other business properly brought before the Annual Meeting.
These items of business are more fully described in the Proxy Statement accompanying this Notice.
The record date for the Annual Meeting is Monday, March 28, 2022. Only stockholders of record at the close of business on that date may vote at the Annual Meeting or any adjournment thereof.
By Order of the Board of Directors
/s/ Jennifer Bealer
Jennifer Bealer
Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
New York, New York
April 14, 2022
IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING THE AVAILABILITY OF PROXY MATERIALS FOR THE STOCKHOLDERS’ MEETING TO BE HELD ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022, AT 3:00 P.M., EASTERN TIME
The notice of Annual Meeting, the proxy statement and our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 are available at www.edocumentview.com/PGNY
 

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You are cordially invited to attend the virtual Annual Meeting. Whether or not you expect to attend the Annual Meeting, PLEASE VOTE YOUR SHARES. As an alternative to voting online during the Annual Meeting, you may vote your shares by proxy in advance of the Annual Meeting via the internet, by telephone or, if you receive a paper proxy card in the mail, by mailing the completed proxy card. Voting instructions are provided in the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials, or, if you receive a paper proxy card by mail, the instructions are printed on your proxy card.
Even if you have voted by proxy, you may still vote online during the Annual Meeting. Please note, however, that if your shares are held of record by a broker, bank or other agent and you wish to vote during the Annual Meeting, you must follow the instructions from such organization and will need to obtain a proxy issued in your name from that record holder.
 

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PROGYNY, INC.
1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor
New York, New York 10018
PROXY STATEMENT
FOR THE 2022 ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
To Be Held Virtually at https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/n28rff8k On May 25, 2022 at 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time
Our board of directors is soliciting your proxy to vote at the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Annual Meeting”) of Progyny, Inc., a Delaware corporation, to be held virtually, via live webcast at https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/n28rff8k, originating from New York, New York, on Wednesday, May 25, 2022 at 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time, and any adjournment or postponement thereof. Similar to last year, we have determined to hold a virtual Annual Meeting this year in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, as we believe ensuring the safety of our communities, stockholders and personnel is critical at this time. Stockholders attending the virtual meeting will be afforded the same rights and opportunities to participate as they would at an in-person meeting.
For the Annual Meeting, we have elected to furnish our proxy materials, including this proxy statement and our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 (the “Annual Report”), to our stockholders primarily via the internet. On or about April 14, 2022, we expect to mail to our stockholders a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials (the “Notice”) that contains notice of the Annual Meeting and instructions on how to access our proxy materials on the internet, how to vote at the Annual Meeting, and how to request printed copies of the proxy materials. Stockholders may request to receive all future materials in printed form by mail or electronically by e-mail by following the instructions contained in the Notice. A stockholder’s election to receive proxy materials by mail or email will remain in effect until revoked. We encourage stockholders to take advantage of the availability of the proxy materials on the internet to help reduce the environmental impact and cost of our Annual Meeting.
Only stockholders of record at the close of business on Monday, March 28, 2022 (the “Record Date”) will be entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting. On the Record Date, there were 91,726,404 shares of common stock outstanding and entitled to vote. A list of stockholders entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting will be available for examination during normal business hours for 10 days before the Annual Meeting at our address above. The stockholder list will also be available online during the Annual Meeting. For instructions on how to attend the Annual Meeting, please see the instructions on the first page of this proxy statement.
In this proxy statement, we refer to Progyny, Inc. as “Progyny,” “the Company,” “we” or “us” and the board of directors of Progyny as “our board of directors.” The Annual Report, which contains financial statements as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 and for the three years ended December 31, 2021, accompanies this proxy statement. You also may obtain a copy of the Annual Report without charge, by writing to our Secretary at 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018, Attention: General Counsel or by emailing investors@progyny.com.
IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING THE AVAILABILITY OF PROXY MATERIALS FOR THE STOCKHOLDERS’ MEETING TO BE HELD ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2022, AT 3:00 P.M., EASTERN TIME
The notice of Annual Meeting, the proxy statement and our Annual Report are available at
www.edocumentview.com/PGNY
 
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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THESE PROXY MATERIALS AND VOTING
Why did I receive a notice regarding the availability of proxy materials on the internet?
Pursuant to rules adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), we have elected to provide access to our proxy materials over the internet. Accordingly, we have sent you the Notice because our board of directors is soliciting your proxy to vote at the 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 25, 2022, including at any adjournments or postponements thereof. All stockholders will have the ability to access the proxy materials on the website referred to in the Notice or to request a printed set of the proxy materials. Instructions on how to access the proxy materials over the internet or to request a printed copy may be found in the Notice.
We intend to mail the Notice on or about April 14, 2022 to all stockholders of record entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting.
Will I receive any other proxy materials by mail?
We may elect to send you a proxy card, along with a second Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials, after 10 calendar days have passed since our first mailing of the Notice.
How do I attend, participate in, and ask questions during the virtual Annual Meeting?
We will be hosting the Annual Meeting via live webcast only. You may attend the virtual Annual Meeting live online at https://edge.media-server.com/mmc/p/n28rff8k. The meeting will start at 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time, on Wednesday, May 25, 2022. Stockholders attending the virtual Annual Meeting will be afforded the same rights and opportunities to participate as they would at an in-person meeting. We recommend that you log in a few minutes before 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time to ensure you are logged in when the Annual Meeting starts. The webcast will open 15 minutes before the start of the Annual Meeting.
If you would like to submit a question, you may do so before or during the Annual Meeting by emailing investors@progyny.com. Questions may be ruled out of order if they are, among other things, irrelevant to our business, related to pending or threatened litigation, disorderly, repetitious of statements already made, or in furtherance of the speaker’s own personal, political or business interests.
No audio or video recordings of the Annual Meeting are permitted.
Why is this Annual Meeting being held as a virtual only meeting?
In light of the ongoing concerns with respect to COVID-19, including the spread of variants, and out of an abundance of caution, we will be conducting the Annual Meeting by remote communication only. The health and well-being of our employees and stockholders remains our top priority. Furthermore, we are excited to embrace the latest technology to provide expanded access, improved communication and cost savings for our stockholders and us. We believe that hosting a virtual meeting will enable increased stockholder attendance and participation since stockholders can participate from any location around the world, while saving the Company and investors time and money. A virtual meeting is also environmentally friendly and sustainable over the long-term. Stockholders can submit questions both ahead of and during the Annual Meeting by emailing investors@progyny.com. Our virtual meeting also enables us to provide non-stockholders the opportunity to listen to our meeting.
Who can vote at the Annual Meeting?
Only stockholders of record at the close of business on the Record Date, March 28, 2022, will be entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting. On the Record Date, there were 91,726,404 shares of common stock outstanding and entitled to vote.
Stockholder of Record: Shares Registered in Your Name
If on the Record Date, your shares were registered directly in your name with our transfer agent, Computershare Trust Company, N.A., then you are a stockholder of record. As a stockholder of record,
 
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you may vote online during the Annual Meeting or vote by proxy in advance of the Annual Meeting. Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting, we urge you to vote your shares by proxy in advance of the Annual Meeting, either electronically through the internet, by telephone or by completing and returning a printed proxy card that you may request or that we may elect to deliver at a later time to ensure your vote is counted.
Beneficial Owner: Shares Registered in the Name of a Broker or Bank
If on the Record Date, your shares were held, not in your name, but rather in an account at a brokerage firm, bank or other similar organization, then you are the beneficial owner of shares held in “street name” and the Notice is being forwarded to you by that organization. The organization holding your account is considered to be the stockholder of record for purposes of voting at the Annual Meeting. As a beneficial owner, you have the right to direct your broker, bank or other agent regarding how to vote the shares in your account. You are also invited to attend the Annual Meeting. However, since you are not the stockholder of record, you may vote your shares online during the Annual Meeting only by following the instructions from such organization and after obtaining a valid proxy from your broker, bank or other agent.
What am I voting on?
There are three matters scheduled for a vote:

Proposal 1:   Election of each of Fred Cohen, M.D., D.Phil., Norman Payson, M.D. and Beth Seidenberg, M.D.as Class III directors, each to hold office until our annual meeting of stockholders in 2025;

Proposal 2:   Ratification of the selection by the audit committee of our board of directors of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022; and

Proposal 3:   Approval, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, of the compensation of our named executive officers.
What if another matter is properly brought before the Annual Meeting?
Our board of directors knows of no other matters that will be presented for consideration at the Annual Meeting. If any other matters are properly brought before the Annual Meeting, it is the intention of the persons named in the accompanying proxy to vote on those matters in accordance with their best judgment.
How do I vote?
Stockholder of Record: Shares Registered in Your Name.   If you are a stockholder of record, you may vote (1) online during the Annual Meeting or (2) in advance of the Annual Meeting by proxy through the internet, by telephone or by using a proxy card that you may request or that we may elect to deliver at a later time. Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting, we urge you to vote by proxy to ensure your vote is counted. You may still attend the Annual Meeting and vote online even if you have already voted by proxy.

To vote during the Annual Meeting, go to www.investorvote.com/PGNY, starting at 3:00 p.m., Eastern Time on Wednesday May 25, 2022. You will be asked to provide the control number from the Notice or the printed proxy card.

To vote online in advance of the Annual Meeting, go to www.investorvote.com/PGNY to complete an electronic proxy card. You will be asked to provide the control number from the Notice or the printed proxy card. Your internet vote must be received by 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time on Tuesday, May 24, 2022 to be counted.

To vote in advance of the Annual Meeting by telephone, dial 1-800-652-VOTE (8683), which is the number found on the Notice or the printed proxy card that may be delivered to you using a touch-tone phone and follow the recorded instructions. You will be asked to provide the control number from
 
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the Notice or the printed proxy card. Your telephone vote must be received by 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time on Tuesday, May 24, 2022 to be counted.

To vote in advance of the Annual Meeting using a printed proxy card that may be delivered to you, simply complete, sign and date the proxy card and return it promptly in the envelope provided. If you return your signed proxy card to us before the Annual Meeting, we will vote your shares as you direct.
Beneficial Owner: Shares Registered in the Name of Broker or Bank.   If you are a beneficial owner of shares registered in the name of your broker, bank or other agent, you should have received a Notice containing voting instructions from that organization rather than from us. Simply follow the voting instructions in the Notice to ensure that your vote is counted. To vote online during the Annual Meeting, you must follow the instructions from your broker, bank or other agent.
Can I vote my shares by filling out and returning the Notice?
No. The Notice identifies the items to be voted on at the Annual Meeting, but you cannot vote by marking the Notice and returning it. The Notice provides instructions on how to vote by proxy in advance of the Annual Meeting through the internet, by telephone or by using a printed proxy card, or by submitting a ballot online during the Annual Meeting.
What does it mean if I receive more than one Notice?
If you receive more than one Notice, your shares may be registered in more than one name or in different accounts. Please follow the voting instructions on the Notices to ensure that all of your shares are voted.
Can I change my vote after submitting my proxy?

Stockholder of Record: Shares Registered in Your Name.   If you are a stockholder of record, then yes, you can revoke your proxy at any time before the final vote at the Annual Meeting. You may revoke your proxy in any one of the following ways:

Submit another properly completed proxy card with a later date.

Grant a subsequent proxy by telephone or through the internet.

Send a timely written notice that you are revoking your proxy to our Secretary at 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018, Attention: General Counsel or via email at investors@progyny.com.

Attend the virtual Annual Meeting and vote online. Simply attending the Annual Meeting will not, by itself, revoke your proxy. Even if you plan to attend the Annual Meeting, we recommend that you also submit your proxy or voting instructions or vote in advance of the Annual Meeting by telephone or through the internet so that your vote will be counted if you later decide not to attend the Annual Meeting.
Your most current proxy card or telephone or internet proxy is the one that is counted.

Beneficial Owner: Shares Registered in the Name of Broker or Bank.   If you are a beneficial owner and your shares are held in “street name” by your broker, bank or other agent, you should follow the instructions provided by your broker, bank or other agent.
If I am a stockholder of record and I do not vote, or if I return a proxy card or otherwise vote without giving specific voting instructions, what happens?
If you are a stockholder of record and do not vote through the internet, by telephone, by completing the proxy card that may be delivered to you or online during the Annual Meeting, your shares will not be voted.
If you return a signed and dated proxy card or otherwise vote without marking voting selections, your shares will be voted in accordance with the recommendations of our board of directors: “FOR” the election of each of the three nominees for director, “FOR” the ratification of the selection of Ernst & Young LLP
 
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as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022 and “FOR” the approval, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, of the compensation of the Company’s named executive officers. If any other matter is properly presented at the Annual Meeting, your proxyholder (one of the individuals named on your proxy card) will vote your shares using his or her best judgment.
If I am a beneficial owner of shares held in “street name” and I do not provide my broker, bank or other agent with voting instructions, what happens?
If you are a beneficial owner and do not instruct your broker, bank or other agent how to vote your shares, the question of whether your broker or nominee will still be able to vote your shares depends on whether, pursuant to stock exchange rules, the particular proposal is deemed to be a “routine” matter. The only routine matter on the agenda for the Annual Meeting is the ratification of appointment of our independent registered public accounting firm (Proposal 2). Brokers and nominees can use their discretion to vote “uninstructed” shares with respect to matters that are considered to be “routine,” but not with respect to “non-routine” matters. Under applicable rules and interpretations, “non-routine” matters are matters that may substantially affect the rights or privileges of stockholders, such as mergers, stockholder proposals, elections of directors (even if not contested), executive compensation, and certain corporate governance proposals, even if management-supported. Accordingly, your broker or nominee may vote your shares on Proposal 2. Your broker or nominee, however, may not vote your shares on Proposal 1 or Proposal 3 without your instructions. Such an event would result in a “broker non-vote” and these shares will not be counted as having been voted on Proposal 1 or Proposal 3. Please instruct your bank, broker or other agent to ensure that your vote will be counted.
What are “broker non-votes”?
As discussed above, when a beneficial owner of shares held in “street name” does not give instructions to the broker or nominee holding the shares as to how to vote on matters deemed to be “non-routine,” the broker or nominee cannot vote the shares. These unvoted shares are counted as “broker non-votes.”
As a reminder, if you a beneficial owner of shares held in “street name,” in order to ensure your shares are voted in the way you would prefer, you must provide voting instructions to your broker, bank or other agent by the deadline provided in the materials you receive from such organization.
How are votes counted?
Votes will be counted by the inspector of election appointed for the Annual Meeting, who will separately count, with respect to the proposal to elect directors, votes “FOR,” “WITHHOLD” and broker non-votes; with respect to the proposal to ratify the selection of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022, votes “FOR,” “AGAINST” and abstentions; and with respect to the approval, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, of the compensation of our named executive officers, votes “FOR,” “AGAINST,” abstentions and broker non-votes.
How many votes are needed to approve each proposal?

Proposal 1:   For the election of directors, the three nominees receiving the most “FOR” votes from the holders of shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the election of directors will be elected. Only votes “FOR” will affect the outcome. “WITHHOLD” votes will have no effect on the proposal. Broker non-votes will not be counted as present and are not entitled to vote on this proposal.

Proposal 2:   To be approved, the ratification of the selection of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for fiscal year ending December 31, 2022 must receive “FOR” votes from the holders of a majority of shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the matter. Abstentions and broker non-votes will be counted as present for purposes of this vote, and therefore will have the same effect as an “AGAINST” vote.

Proposal 3:   To be approved, the approval, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, of the compensation of our named executive officers must receive the most “FOR” votes from the holders of a majority of shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the matter.
 
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Abstentions will be counted as present for the purposes of this vote, and therefore will have the same effect as an “AGAINST” vote. Broker non-votes will not be counted as present and are not entitled to vote on the proposal.
What is the quorum requirement?
A quorum of stockholders is necessary to hold a valid meeting. A quorum will be present if stockholders holding at least a majority of the outstanding shares entitled to vote are present at the Annual Meeting by virtual attendance or represented by proxy. On the Record Date, there were 91,726,404 shares outstanding and entitled to vote.
Your shares will be counted towards the quorum only if you submit a valid proxy (or one is submitted on your behalf by your broker, bank or other agent) or if you vote online during the Annual Meeting.
Abstentions and broker non-votes will be counted towards the quorum requirement. If there is no quorum, the holders of a majority of shares present at the Annual Meeting by virtual attendance or represented by proxy may adjourn the Annual Meeting to another date.
Is there a list of stockholders entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting?
The names of stockholders entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting will be available at the Annual Meeting and for 10 days prior to the Annual Meeting for any purpose germane to the Annual Meeting, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Eastern Time, at our principal executive offices at
1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10018, by contacting General Counsel.
How can I find out the results of the voting at the Annual Meeting?
Preliminary voting results will be announced at the Annual Meeting. In addition, final voting results will be published in a current report on Form 8-K that we expect to file within four business days after the Annual Meeting. If final voting results are not available to us in time to file a Form 8-K within four business days after the Annual Meeting, we intend to file a Form 8-K to publish preliminary results and, within four business days after the final results are known to us, file an additional Form 8-K to publish the final results.
When are stockholder proposals due for next year’s annual meeting?
To be considered for inclusion in next year’s proxy materials, your proposal must be submitted in writing by December 15, 2022, to our Secretary at 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018, Attention: General Counsel.
Pursuant to our amended and restated bylaws, if you wish to submit a proposal (including a director nomination) at the 2023 annual meeting that is not to be included in next year’s proxy materials, you must do so not later than the close of business on February 24, 2023 nor earlier than the close of business on January 25, 2023. However, if the date of our 2023 annual meeting is not held between April 25, 2023 and June 25, 2023, to be timely, notice by the stockholder must be received (A) not earlier than the close of business on the 120th day prior to the 2023 annual meeting and (B) not later than the close of business on the later of the 90th day prior to the 2023 annual meeting or the 10th day following the day on which public announcement of the date of the 2023 annual meeting is first made. You are also advised to review our amended and restated bylaws, which contain additional requirements about advance notice of stockholder proposals and director nominations.
In addition to satisfying the foregoing requirements under our amended and restated bylaws, to comply with the universal proxy rules (once they become effective), stockholders who intend to solicit proxies in support of director nominees other than our nominees must provide notice that sets forth the information required by Rule 14a-19 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) no later than March 27, 2023.
Who is paying for this proxy solicitation?
We will pay for the cost of soliciting proxies. In addition to these proxy materials, our directors and employees may also solicit proxies in person, by telephone or by other means of communication. Directors
 
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and employees will not be paid additional compensation for soliciting proxies. We may reimburse brokers, banks and other agents for the cost of forwarding proxy materials to beneficial owners.
We intend to file a proxy statement and WHITE proxy card with the SEC in connection with the solicitation of proxies for our 2023 annual meeting. Stockholders may obtain our proxy statement (and any amendments and supplements thereto) and other documents as and when filed by us with the SEC without charge from the SEC’s website at: www.sec.gov.
 
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PROPOSAL 1
ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
Our board of directors currently consists of 10 members and is divided into three classes as follows:

Class I directors:   Malissia Clinton, Kevin Gordon and Cheryl Scott, whose terms will expire at the annual meeting of stockholders to be held in 2023;

Class II directors:   Peter Anevski, Roger Holstein, Jeff Park and David Schlanger whose terms will expire at the annual meeting of stockholders to be held in 2024; and

Class III directors:   Fred Cohen, M.D., D.Phil., Norman Payson, M.D. and Beth Seidenberg, M.D., whose terms will expire at the upcoming Annual Meeting.
Each class consists of, as nearly as possible, one-third of the total number of directors, and each class has a three-year term. At each annual meeting of stockholders, the successors to directors whose terms then expire will be elected to serve from the time of election until the third annual meeting following the election. Any additional directorships resulting from an increase in the number of directors will be distributed among the three classes so that, as nearly as possible, each class will consist of one-third of the directors. On April 2, 2022, Ms. Clinton notified the board of directors of her resignation from our board of directors and from the nominating and corporate governance committee, effective April 18, 2022 as a result of new outside restrictions related to board commitments. Ms. Clinton’s resignation did not result from any disagreement with the Company on any matter relating to its operations, policies or practices. Ms. Clinton’s resignation does not change our board of directors’ recommendations, or the Company’s view, on any of the proposals contained in the Proxy Statement. Our nominating and corporate governance committee intends to identify a nominee to be recommended for election to our board of directors in order to fill the vacancy created by Ms. Clinton’s resignation. Vacancies on the board of directors may be filled only by persons elected by a majority of the remaining directors. A director elected by the board of directors to fill a vacancy in a class, including vacancies created by an increase in the number of directors, shall serve for the remainder of the full term of that class and until the director’s successor is duly elected and qualified. The division of our board of directors into three classes with staggered three-year terms may delay or prevent a change of our management or a change in control of Progyny.
Dr. Cohen, Dr. Payson, and Dr. Seidenberg are currently members of our board of directors and have been nominated for reelection to serve as Class III directors. Each of these nominees was recommended to our board of directors by our nominating and corporate governance committee. Each nominee has agreed to stand for reelection at the Annual Meeting, and our management has no reason to believe that any nominee will be unable to serve. If elected at the Annual Meeting, each of these nominees would serve until the annual meeting of stockholders to be held in 2025 and until his or her successor has been duly elected, or if sooner, until the director’s death, resignation or removal.
Our nominating and corporate governance committee seeks to assemble a board that, as a whole, possesses the appropriate balance of professional and industry knowledge, financial expertise, diversity, and high-level management experience necessary to oversee and direct our business. To that end, the committee has identified and evaluated nominees in the broader context of the board’s overall composition, with the goal of recruiting members who complement and strengthen the skills of other members and who also exhibit integrity, collegiality, sound business judgment and other qualities that the committee views as critical to the effective functioning of the board. To provide a mix of experience and perspective on the board, the committee also takes into account geography, gender, age, ethnic diversity and country of origin. The biographies below include information, as of the date of this proxy statement, regarding the specific and particular experience, qualifications, attributes or skills of each director or director nominee that led the committee to believe that that nominee should continue to serve on the board. However, each of the members of the committee may have a variety of reasons why a particular person would be an appropriate nominee for the board, and these views may differ from the views of other members.
Directors are elected by a plurality of the votes of the holders of shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the election of directors. Accordingly, the three nominees receiving the highest number of “FOR” votes will be elected. Shares represented by executed proxies will be
 
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voted, if authority to do so is not withheld, for the election of the three nominees named above. If any nominee becomes unavailable for election as a result of an unexpected occurrence, shares that would have been voted for that nominee will instead be voted for the election of a substitute nominee proposed by us. Proxies cannot be voted for a greater number of persons than the number of nominees named in this proposal.
Our Board of Directors Unanimously Recommends a Vote FOR Each Class III Director Nominee Named Above.
 
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INFORMATION REGARDING DIRECTOR NOMINEES AND CURRENT DIRECTORS
The following table sets forth, for the Class III nominees and our other directors who will continue in office after the Annual Meeting, their ages and position or office held with us as of the date of this proxy statement:
Name
Age
Principal Occupation/ Position
Class III director nominees for election
at the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Fred E. Cohen, M.D., D.Phil.
65
Director
Norman Payson, M.D.
73
Director
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.
65
Lead Independent Director
Class I directors continuing in office
until the 2023 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Malissia Clinton*
53
Director
Kevin Gordon
59
Director
Cheryl Scott
72
Director
Class II directors continuing in office
ntil the 2024 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Peter Anevski
54
Chief Executive Officer and Director
Roger Holstein
70
Director
Jeff Park
50
Director
David Schlanger
62
Executive Chairman
*
Ms. Clinton resigned from our board of directors effective April 18, 2022
Set forth below is biographical information for the director nominees and each person whose term of office as a director will continue after the Annual Meeting. This includes information regarding each director’s experience, qualifications, attributes or skills that led our board of directors to recommend them for board service.
Nominees for Election at the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Fred E. Cohen, M.D. D.Phil. has served on our board of directors since March 2015. Dr. Cohen is currently a Senior Advisor to TPG Capital, where he previously served for over 15 years as a Partner, and founder of TPG Biotechnology, a life science focused venture capital fund. Beginning in July 2021, Dr. Cohen has served as a co-founder and Chairman of Monograph Capital Partners, a biotechnology venture capital fund. Beginning in November 2017, Dr. Cohen has served as a co-founder and senior managing director of Vida Ventures, LLC, a biotechnology venture capital fund. In addition, for three decades throughout his career, Dr. Cohen has been affiliated with University of California, San Francisco where he held various clinical responsibilities, including as a research scientist, an internist for hospitalized patients, a consulting endocrinologist, and the Chief of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism. Dr. Cohen currently serves on the boards of directors of the following public companies: Urogen Pharma Ltd. (since May 2017), CareDx, Inc. (since January 2003), and lntellia Therapeutics, Inc. (since January 2019). Dr. Cohen also serves on the board of directors of several privately-held companies and previously served on the board of directors of BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc. from July 2013 until January 2019, Quintiles Transnational Holdings, Inc. from May 2007 to November 2015, Roka Bioscience, Inc. from September 2009 to October 2017, Five Prime Therapeutics, Inc. from May 2002 until May 2018, Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. from June 2013 until June 2019, Genomic Health Inc. from April 2002 until November 2019 and Veracyte, Inc. from 2007 until June 2021. Dr. Cohen received his B.S. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University, his D.Phil. in Molecular Biophysics from Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, and his M.D. from Stanford. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Cohen is a California licensed physician. We believe that Dr. Cohen is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his financial and medical knowledge and experience.
 
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Norman Payson, M.D. has served on our board of directors since December 2016. Dr. Payson was co-founder of Healthsource and its Chief Executive Officer from 1985 to 1997, Chief Executive Officer of Oxford Health Plans from 1998 to 2002, Chairman of Concentra from 2005 to 2008 and Chief Executive Officer of Apria Healthcare Group Inc. from 2008 to 2012, where he served on the board of directors from November 2008 to March 2022. Since 1997, Dr. Payson has served as President and a director of NCP, Inc., his family office, through which he engages in consulting and personal investment activities. Additionally, Dr. Payson served as a strategic advisor for Evolent Health, Inc., or Evolent, from March 2014 through December 2020 and previously served on its board of directors from December 2013 to June 2019. Dr. Payson is currently serving on the board of directors of various private and not-for-profit companies including Access Clinical Partners, Smile Brands, Implantable Provider Group, HPM National Advisory Board at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia, USC Schaeffer Center Advisory Board and Executive Services Corporation of Southern California. Dr. Payson is also on the board of Kiva Foundation, a private charitable foundation organized by Dr. Payson and his wife in June 1998. Until June 2020, Dr. Payson served on the board for City of Hope, where he now serves as director emeritus. He continues to serve on the boards of AccessHope and Beckman Research Institute which are subsidiaries of City of Hope. Until June 2019, Dr. Payson served as a director at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, where he now serves as director emeritus. From May 2017 to August 2019 Dr. Payson was a board member of The Center for Orthopedic and Research Excellence, Inc. Dr. Payson holds a B.S. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received his M.D. from Dartmouth Medical School. Dr. Payson is a California licensed physician. We believe that Dr. Payson is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his 30-year career as chief executive officer or chairman of multiple healthcare organizations, including publicly-traded companies.
Beth Seidenberg, M.D. has served on our board of directors since May 2010 and as Lead Independent Director since January 2022. Previously, Dr. Seidenberg served as Chair of our board of directors from June 2015 to December 2021. Dr. Seidenberg has been a partner at Kleiner Perkins, a venture capital firm, since May 2005, where she primarily focuses on life sciences investing. She has also served as the Managing Director of Westlake Village BioPartners, another venture capital firm, since August 2018. Prior to joining Kleiner Perkins, Dr. Seidenberg was the Senior Vice President, Head of Global Development and Chief Medical Officer at Amgen, Inc., a biotechnology company. In addition, Dr. Seidenberg was a senior executive in research and development at Bristol Myers Squibb Company, a biopharmaceutical company, from March 2000 to December 2001 and Merck & Co., Inc., a healthcare company, from June 1989 to February 2000. Dr. Seidenberg has served on the board of directors of Atara Biotherapeutics since August 2012 and Vera Therapeutics, Inc. since June 2016. Dr. Seidenberg previously served on the boards of directors of Epizyme, Inc., from February 2008 to September 2019, Tesaro, Inc., from June 2011 to February 2019, and ARMO BioSciences, Inc. from December 2012 until June 2018. Dr. Seidenberg received a B.S. from Barnard College and an M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine and completed her post-graduate training at the Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University and the National Institutes of Health. We believe that Dr. Seidenberg is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of her extensive experience in the life sciences industry as a senior executive and venture capitalist, as well as her training as a physician.
Directors Continuing In Office Until The 2023 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Malissia Clinton has served as a member of our board of directors since November 2020. Ms. Clinton has served as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary at The Aerospace Corporation, a non-profit corporation that provides technical guidance on space missions, since 2009. She previously worked at Northrop Grumman from 2002 to 2009, including her role as Senior Counsel for Special Projects beginning in 2007. Ms. Clinton joined TRW Space Technology, a division of TRW, Inc., in 1998 as Counsel in its Telecommunication Programs and Avionic Systems division. She began her career as an Associate at Tuttle & Taylor. Additionally, Ms. Clinton has served on the board of directors of 3D Systems Corporation since March 2019 and on the board of directors of City of Hope Medical Center since December 2016. Ms. Clinton holds a B.S. in Political Science and Government from Arizona State University and received her J.D. from Stanford Law School. We believe that Ms. Clinton is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of her strong legal background and extensive experience in corporate governance. On April 2, 2022, Ms. Clinton notified the board of directors of her resignation from our board of directors and from the nominating and corporate governance committee, effective April 18, 2022 as a result of new outside
 
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restrictions related to board commitments. Ms. Clinton’s resignation did not result from any disagreement with the Company on any matter relating to its operations, policies or practices. Ms. Clinton’s resignation does not change our board of directors’ recommendations, or the Company’s view, on any of the proposals contained in the Proxy Statement.
Kevin Gordon has served as a member of our board of directors since October 2019. Mr. Gordon has also served on the board of directors of Veracyte, Inc., a genomic diagnostics company, since December 2016 and as an advisor to 3i Group’s North American healthcare portfolio companies since January 2022, including currently as a director of privately held Q Holdco Limited, Sanisure, Cirtec Medical Corp. and ten23 health. From January 2018 until March 2019, he was the President and Chief Financial Officer of Liquidia Technologies Inc., a clinical biopharmaceutical company. Mr. Gordon served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Quintiles Transnational Holdings Inc., or Quintiles, a research, clinical trial and pharmaceutical consulting company, from October 2015 until its merger with IMS Health Holdings, Inc. (forming IQVIA Holdings, Inc.) in October 2016. Prior to that, he was the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Quintiles from July 2010 until December 2015. Mr. Gordon served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Teleflex Incorporated, a medical device company, from March 2007 until January 2010. Mr. Gordon held various senior corporate development positions at Teleflex Incorporated from 1997 to 2007. Prior thereto, Mr. Gordon held various senior positions, including Chief Financial Officer at Package Machinery Company and senior manager and other positions at KPMG LLP. Mr. Gordon holds a B.S. in Accounting from the University of Connecticut. We believe that Mr. Gordon is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his extensive accounting experience and leadership experience in healthcare companies.
Cheryl Scott has served as a member of our board of directors since October 2019. Since July 2016, Ms. Scott has served as the Main Principal of the McClintock Scott Group. From June 2006 to July 2016, Ms. Scott served as Senior Advisor to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Previously, she served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Seattle-based Group Health Cooperative for eight years. Ms. Scott has served as a member of the board of directors of Evolent Health, Inc. since November 2015. She also currently serves on a variety of private company and not-for-profit boards. She was a member of the board of directors of Recreational Equipment, Incorporated (REI) from 2005 to 2017, and served as the board chairperson from 2015 to 2017. Ms. Scott received her B.A. in Journalism and M.H.A. from the University of Washington, and is currently a Clinical Professor of Health Services at the University of Washington. We believe that Ms. Scott is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of her extensive career in healthcare, leadership and corporate governance, including her tenure as the Chief Executive Officer of Group Health Cooperative.
Directors Continuing In Office Until The 2024 Annual Meeting of Stockholders
Peter Anevski has served as our Chief Executive Officer and on our board of directors since January 2022. He previously served as our Chief Operating Officer from January 2017 to December 2021 and our President from June 2019 to December 2021. From January 2017 to September 2020, he also served as our Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Anevski has extensive experience managing financial functions for public companies. From May 2013 until September 2016, he served as the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of WebMD. Prior to that, Mr. Anevski served in senior finance and operations roles at WebMD and predecessor companies for 14 years, including as Senior Vice President, Finance. Mr. Anevski received his B.A. in Accounting from Montclair State University. We believe that Mr. Anevski is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his significant experience at healthcare companies and as a member of our executive management team.
Roger Holstein has served as a member of our board of directors since November 2020. He has been a Managing Director at Vestar Capital Partners, a private equity firm, since 2006. He currently serves on the boards of the following privately held companies: Quest Analytics and Mercury Healthcare. From 1997 to 2005, Mr. Holstein served as Chief Executive Officer, President or Director of WebMD Health Corp., or WebMD, and helped establish it as the leading source of healthcare information for consumers and professionals. From 1991 to 1996, Mr. Holstein was a member of the Office of the President at Medco, where he helped create the business of prescription benefit management. Prior to that, Mr. Holstein held executive positions at MCI, Warner Amex Cable and Grey Advertising. He began his career in marketing with
 
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the Spirits of St. Louis basketball team in the American Basketball Association. Mr. Holstein holds a B.A. in English Literature and Art History, with distinction, from Swarthmore College. We believe that Mr. Holstein is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his extensive leadership and healthcare experience.
Jeff Park has served as a member of our board of directors since October 2019. Mr. Park has served since April 2019 as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of WellDyneRx, an independent pharmacy benefits manager and has served as a member of the board of directors for P3 Health Partners since December 2021. From January 2018 until May 2018, he was the Interim Chief Executive Officer of Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., or Diplomat, a provider of specialty pharmacy services. Additionally, from June 2017 to February 2019, he served on the board of directors of Diplomat. Prior to that, from July 2015 until July 2016, he was the Chief Operating Officer of OptumRX, the entity resulting from the merger of Catamaran Corporation, or Catamaran, and OptumRX, UnitedHealthcare Group’s free-standing pharmacy care services business. Before the merger, from March 2014 until July 2015, he was Catamaran’s Executive Vice President, Operations, and previously served as Catamaran’s Chief Financial Officer, beginning in 2006. Mr. Park served as a member of the board of directors for Ray Graham Assoc. Illinois Disability not for profit from January 2010 to June 2016. Mr. Park holds a B.S. in Accounting from Brock University and he is a Certified Public Accountant. We believe that Mr. Park is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his extensive leadership experience in the pharmaceutical industry.
David Schlanger has served as our Executive Chairman since January 2022 and on our board of directors since March 2017. Mr. Schlanger was previously our Chief Executive Officer from January 2017 to December 2021. From August 2013 until September 2016, he served as the Chief Executive Officer of WebMD, an online provider of information relating to health and well-being. Prior to that, he served as the Interim Chief Executive Officer and in various other senior executive positions at WebMD and predecessor companies for more than 15 years, including as Senior Vice President, Strategic and Corporate Development and Senior Vice President, Corporate Development. Mr. Schlanger received his B.S. from Georgetown University and his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. We believe that Mr. Schlanger is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his extensive experience at healthcare companies and in executive management.
 
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INFORMATION REGARDING THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Independence of the Board of Directors
Our common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (“Nasdaq”). Under the Nasdaq listing standards, a majority of the members of our board of directors must qualify as “independent,” as affirmatively determined by our board of directors. Our board of directors consults with our internal and external counsel to ensure that its determinations are consistent with relevant securities and other laws and regulations regarding the definition of “independent,” including those set forth in pertinent listing standards of Nasdaq, as in effect from time to time.
Consistent with these considerations, after review of all relevant identified transactions or relationships between each director, and any of his or her family members, and Progyny, our senior management, external counsel and our independent auditors, our board of directors has affirmatively determined that the following eight directors are independent directors within the meaning of the applicable Nasdaq listing standards: Ms. Clinton, Dr. Cohen, Mr. Gordon, Mr. Holstein, Mr. Park, Dr. Payson, Ms. Scott and Dr. Seidenberg. In making this determination, our board of directors found that none of these directors or nominees for director had a material or other disqualifying relationship with Progyny. Each of Mr. Anevski and Mr. Schlanger, by virtue of their positions as our Chief Executive Officer and Executive Chairman, respectively, is not independent.
Accordingly, a majority of our directors are independent, as required under applicable Nasdaq rules. In making this determination, our board of directors considered the applicable Nasdaq rules and the current and prior relationships that each non-employee director has with our company and all other facts and circumstances our board of directors deemed relevant in determining their independence, including their beneficial ownership of our capital stock.
There are no family relationships among any of our directors or executive officers.
Board Leadership Structure
Currently, David Schlanger serves as the Executive Chairman of the board of directors. The board of directors has carefully considered its leadership structure and determined that Mr. Schlanger is best situated to serve as Executive Chairman given his deep knowledge of our business and strategy and ability to draw on that experience in order to provide the board of directors, in coordination our lead independent director, leadership to focus its discussions, review and oversight of the Company’s strategy, business, and operating and financial performance.
Our Corporate Governance Guidelines provide that whenever our chairperson of the board of directors is a director that does not qualify as an independent director, the independent directors may elect a lead director. Dr. Beth Seidenberg currently serves as our lead independent director. The primary responsibilities of the lead independent director are to: work with the Chief Executive Officer to develop board meeting schedules and agendas; provide the Chief Executive Officer feedback on the quality, quantity and timeliness of the information provided to the board of directors; develop the agenda for and moderate executive sessions of the independent members of the board of directors; preside over board meetings when the chairperson is not present; act as principal liaison between the independent members of the board of directors and Chief Executive Officer; convene meetings of the independent directors as appropriate; and perform other duties as the board of directors may determine from time to time. Accordingly, Dr. Seidenberg has substantial ability to shape the work of our board of directors.
The board of directors recognizes that one of its key responsibilities is to evaluate and determine its optimal leadership structure to provide independent oversight of management. The board of directors believes that, given the dynamic and competitive environment in which we operate, the optimal board leadership structure may vary as circumstances warrant. Our board of directors will continue to consider whether the position of our chairperson of the board of directors should qualify as an independent director at any given time as part of our succession planning process. In addition, we believe that having either an independent board chair or a lead independent director creates an environment that is conducive to objective evaluation and oversight of management’s performance, increasing management accountability and
 
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improving the ability of our board of directors to monitor whether management’s actions are in the best interests of Progyny and our stockholders. As a result, we believe that having an either an independent board chair or a lead independent director can enhance the effectiveness of the board as a whole. The board of directors periodically reviews its leadership structure to determine whether it continues to best serve Progyny and its stockholders.
Role of the Board of Directors in Risk Oversight
One of the key functions of our board of directors is informed oversight of our risk management process. Our board of directors does not have a standing risk management committee, but rather administers this oversight function directly through the board of directors as a whole, as well as through various standing committees of our board of directors that address risks inherent in their respective areas of oversight. In particular, our full board of directors is responsible for monitoring and assessing strategic risk exposure as well as new and emerging risks. For example, our board of directors has been closely monitoring the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, its potential effects on our business, and risk mitigation strategies. Our audit committee has the responsibility to consider and discuss our major financial risk exposures and the steps our management has taken to monitor and control these exposures, including guidelines and policies to govern the process by which risk assessment and management is undertaken. Our audit committee also monitors compliance with legal and regulatory requirements. Specific areas of focus for the audit committee include our policies and other matters relating to our investments, cash management, major financial risk exposures, the adequacy and effectiveness of our information security policies and practices and the internal controls regarding information security. Our compensation committee assesses and monitors whether any of our compensation policies and programs has the potential to encourage excessive risk-taking. At periodic meetings of our board of directors and its committees, management reports to and seeks guidance from our board of directors and its committees with respect to the most significant risks that could affect our business, such as legal risks, information security and privacy risks, and financial, tax and audit related risks.
Corporate Responsibility
Our board of directors is committed to corporate responsibility and our employees are guided by our mission to make dreams of parenthood come true through healthy, timely and supported fertility journeys. Our solution aims to remove financial barriers, provide culturally competent concierge patient support and education, and allow equitable access to high quality care through the largest network of premier fertility specialists in the United States. Our Medical Advisory Board, comprised of leading reproductive endocrinologists across the United States, ensures that our plan design recognizes the unique needs and cultural differences in approach to treatment that members might require. We also provide curated member education throughout the year focused on various topics like infertility in the BIPOC community, LGBTQ+ family building and single parents by choice. Our board of directors acknowledges that we cannot just focus on helping members build their families for today. Our work must also create a fair and just future. Health disparities in fertility and maternal health continue, and we are dedicated to providing support to our employees, members, and employer clients to close the gaps. We published our first corporate sustainability report on our website, which further highlights our approach to corporate responsibility. Nothing on our website shall be deemed incorporated by reference into this proxy statement.
Meetings of the Board of Directors and its Committees
Our board of directors is responsible for the oversight of management and the strategy of our company and for establishing corporate policies. Our board of directors meets periodically during the year to review significant developments affecting us and to act on matters requiring the approval of our board of directors. Our board of directors met five times during our last fiscal year. The audit committee met four times during our last fiscal year, our compensation committee met two times during our last fiscal year, and our nominating and corporate governance committee met three times during our last fiscal year. During our last fiscal year, each director attended 75% or more of the aggregate of the meetings of our board of directors and of the committees on which he or she served during the period in which he or she served as a director. We encourage our directors and nominees for director to attend our Annual Meeting of stockholders. Six of our nine then-incumbent directors attended our annual meeting of stockholders held in 2021.
 
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Information Regarding Committees of the Board of Directors
Our board of directors has established an audit committee, a compensation committee and a nominating and corporate governance committee. Our board of directors may establish other committees to facilitate the management of our business. Our board of directors has adopted written charters for each of our committees, which are available to stockholders on our investor relations website at investors.progyny.com.
The following table provides membership information for fiscal 2021 for each of the committees of our board of directors:
Name
Audit
Compensation
Nominating
and Corporate
Governance
Malissia Clinton**
X
Fred Cohen, M.D., D.Phil.
X*
Kevin Gordon
X X
Roger Holstein
X
Jeff Park
X* X
Norman Payson, M.D.
X X*
Cheryl Scott
X
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.
X
*
Committee Chairperson
**
Ms. Clinton resigned from our board of directors and the nominating and corporate governance committee effective April 18, 2022
Our board of directors has determined that each member of each committee meets the applicable Nasdaq rules and regulations regarding “independence” and each member is free of any relationship that would impair his or her individual exercise of independent judgment with regard to us.
Below is a description of each committee of our board of directors.
Audit Committee
The audit committee of our board of directors is composed of three directors: Mr. Gordon, Mr. Park and Dr. Payson, with Mr. Park serving as chair of the audit committee.
Our board of directors has determined that each of these individuals meets the independence requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act, and the applicable listing standards of Nasdaq. Each member of our audit committee can read and understand fundamental financial statements in accordance with Nasdaq audit committee requirements. In arriving at this determination, our board of directors has examined each audit committee member’s scope of experience and the nature of their prior and/or current employment. Additionally, our board of directors has determined that Mr. Gordon, Mr. Park, and Dr. Payson all qualify as audit committee financial experts within the meaning of SEC regulations and meet the financial sophistication requirements of the Nasdaq Listing Rules. In making this determination, our board of directors has considered each of Mr. Gordon, Mr. Park and Dr. Payson’s formal education and previous and current experience in financial and accounting roles. Both our independent registered public accounting firm and management periodically meet privately with our audit committee.
The primary purpose of the audit committee is to discharge the responsibilities of our board of directors with respect to our corporate accounting and financial reporting processes, systems of internal control and financial statement audits, and to oversee our independent registered public accounting firm. Specific responsibilities of our audit committee include:

helping our board of directors oversee our corporate accounting and financial reporting processes, systems of internal control, financial statements audits and the integrity of the Company’s financial statements;
 
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managing the selection, engagement terms, fees, qualifications, independence and performance of the registered public accounting firm engaged as the Company’s independent outside auditor for the purposes of preparing or issuing an audit report or performing audit services;

maintaining and fostering an open avenue of communication with the Company’s management, internal audit group (if any) and the registered public accounting firm engaged as the Company’s independent outside auditor;

overseeing the design, implementation, organization and performance of the Company’s internal audit function (if any);

providing regular reports and information to our board of directors;

assessing, at least annually, the qualifications, performance and independence of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm;

discussing the scope and results of the audit with the independent registered public accounting firm, and reviewing, with management and the independent accountants, our interim and year-end operating results and any proposed earnings announcements;

reviewing and discussing with the independent registered public accounting firm and management significant issues regarding accounting principles and presentation of financial statements;

overseeing the policies and procedures as required by applicable law and Nasdaq listing requirements governing how we may employ individuals who are or were once employed by our independent registered public accounting firm;

developing procedures for employees to submit concerns anonymously about questionable accounting or audit matters;

reviewing related person transactions;

reviewing and discussing with management our processes and policies with respect to risk identification, management and assessment in all areas of our business;

obtaining and reviewing a report by the independent registered public accounting firm at least annually that describes our internal quality control procedures, any material issues with such procedures and any steps taken to deal with such issues when required by applicable law;

approving or, as permitted, pre-approving, audit and permissible non-audit services to be performed by the independent registered public accounting firm;

reviewing with management, the independent registered public accounting firm, and outside advisors or accountants any correspondence with regulators or governmental agencies and any published reports that raise material issues regarding our financial statements or accounting policies; and

evaluating the audit committee’s performance and the adequacy of our audit committee charter at least annually.
The audit committee appreciates the rapidly evolving nature of threats presented by cybersecurity incidents and is committed to the prevention, timely detection, and mitigation of the effects of any such incidents on the Company. With respect to cybersecurity, the audit committee maintains oversight of the Company’s security posture, including the internal and external cybersecurity threat landscape, incident response, assessment and training activities, and relevant legislative, regulatory, and technical developments.
We believe that the composition and functioning of our audit committee complies with all applicable requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and all applicable SEC and Nasdaq rules and regulations. We intend to comply with future requirements to the extent they become applicable to us.
Report of the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors
The audit committee has reviewed and discussed the audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 with our management. The audit committee has also reviewed and discussed with
 
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Ernst & Young LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm, the matters required to be discussed by Auditing Standard No. 1301, Communications with Audit Committees, as adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”). The audit committee has also received the written disclosures and the letter from Ernst & Young LLP required by applicable requirements of the PCAOB regarding the independent accountants’ communications with the audit committee concerning independence, and has discussed with Ernst & Young LLP the accounting firm’s independence. Based on the foregoing, the audit committee has recommended to our board of directors that the audited financial statements be included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 and filed with the SEC.
Jeff Park, Chair
Kevin Gordon
Norman Payson, M.D.
The material in this report is not “soliciting material,” is not deemed “filed” with the SEC and is not to be incorporated by reference in any filing of Progyny under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filing.
Compensation Committee
The compensation committee of our board of directors is composed of four directors: Dr. Cohen, Mr. Holstein, Mr. Park and Dr. Seidenberg, with Dr. Cohen serving as chair of the compensation committee. All members of the compensation committee are independent (as independence is currently defined in Rule 5605(d)(2) of the Nasdaq listing standards).
Each of the members of the compensation committee is a non-employee director, as defined in Rule 16b-3 promulgated under the Exchange Act. Our board of directors has determined that each of these individuals is “independent” as defined under the applicable listing standards of Nasdaq, including the standards specific to members of a compensation committee.
The primary purpose of our compensation committee is to discharge the responsibilities of our board of directors in overseeing our compensation policies, plans and programs and to review and determine the compensation to be paid to our executive officers, directors and other senior management, as appropriate.
Specific responsibilities of our compensation committee include:

reviewing and approving the compensation of our Chief Executive Officer, other executive officers and senior management;

reviewing, evaluating and recommending to our board of directors succession plans for our executive officers;

reviewing and recommending to our board of directors the compensation paid to our directors;

reviewing the practices and policies of employee compensation as they relate to risk management and risk-taking incentives;

administering our equity incentive plans and other benefits programs;

reviewing, adopting, amending and terminating incentive compensation and equity plans, severance agreements, profit sharing plans, bonus plans, change-of-control protections and any other compensatory arrangements for our executive officers and other senior management;

reviewing and approving general policies relating to compensation and benefits of our employees, including our overall compensation strategy;

reviewing and discussing with management any conflict of interest raised by the work of a compensation consultant or advisor hired by the compensation committee or management; and

evaluating the compensation committee’s performance and the adequacy of our compensation committee charter at least annually.
 
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We believe that the composition and functioning of our compensation committee complies with all applicable SEC and Nasdaq rules and regulations. We intend to comply with future requirements to the extent they become applicable to us.
Compensation Committee Processes and Procedures
Our compensation committee meets at least annually and with greater frequency, if necessary. The compensation committee also acts periodically by unanimous written consent in lieu of a formal meeting. The agenda for each meeting is usually developed by the chair of the compensation committee, in consultation with management. The compensation committee meets regularly in executive session.
However, from time to time, various members of management and other employees as well as outside advisors or consultants may be invited by the compensation committee to make presentations, to provide financial or other background information or advice or to otherwise participate in compensation committee meetings. Our Chief Executive Officer may not participate in, or be present during, any deliberations or determinations of the compensation committee regarding his compensation.
The charter of the compensation committee grants the compensation committee full access to all books, records, facilities and personnel of Progyny. In addition, under its charter, the compensation committee has the authority to obtain, at our expense, advice and assistance from compensation consultants and legal, accounting or other outside advisors and other external resources that the compensation committee considers necessary or appropriate in the performance of its duties. The compensation committee has direct responsibility for the oversight of the work of any consultants or advisers engaged for the purpose of advising the compensation committee. In particular, the compensation committee has the authority to retain compensation consultants to assist in its evaluation of executive and director compensation, including the authority to approve the consultant’s reasonable fees and other retention terms. The compensation committee also may form and delegate authority to one or more subcommittees consisting of one or more members of our board of directors (whether or not he, she or they are on the compensation committee) to the extent allowed under applicable law and stock exchange listing requirements. Although the compensation committee may act on any issue that has been delegated to the chair of the compensation committee or a subcommittee, doing so will not limit or restrict future action by the chair of the compensation committee or subcommittee on any matters delegated to it. Any action or decision of the chair of the compensation committee or a subcommittee will be presented to the full compensation committee at its next scheduled meeting.
Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation
None of the members of the compensation committee are currently, or have been at any time, one of our officers or employees. None of our executive officers currently serve, or have served during the last year, as a member of the board of directors or compensation committee of any entity that has one or more executive officers serving as a member of our board of directors or compensation committee.
Compensation Committee Report
The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section with management. Based on such review and discussion, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section be included in this proxy statement and incorporated by reference in the Company’s annual report on Form 10- K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.
Fred Cohen, M.D., D.Phil., Chair
Roger Holstein
Jeff Park
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.
 
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The material in this report is not “soliciting material,” is not deemed “filed” with the SEC and is not to be incorporated by reference in any filing of Progyny under the Securities or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filing.
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee
The nominating and corporate governance committee of our board of directors is composed of four directors: Ms. Clinton, Mr. Gordon, Dr. Payson and Ms. Scott, with Dr. Payson serving as chair of the nominating and corporate governance committee. On April 2, 2022, Ms. Clinton notified the board of directors of her resignation from our board of directors and from the nominating and corporate governance committee, effective April 18, 2022 as a result of new outside restrictions related to board commitments. All members of the nominating and corporate governance committee are independent (as independence is currently defined in Rule 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq listing standards). Specific responsibilities of our nominating and corporate governance committee include:

identifying and evaluating candidates, including the nomination of incumbent directors for reelection and nominees recommended by stockholders, to serve on our board of directors;

considering and recommending to our board of directors regarding the composition and chairmanship of the committees of our board of directors;

instituting plans or programs for the continuing education of our board of directors and orientation of new directors;

reviewing, assessing and recommending to our board of directors regarding corporate governance guidelines and matters;

overseeing periodic evaluations of the board of directors’ performance, including committees of the board of directors;

reviewing periodically the processes and procedures used by the Company to provide information to our board of directors and its committees, and, as appropriate, recommending changes to our board of directors;

evaluating the nominating and corporate governance committee’s performance and the adequacy of our nominating and corporate governance committee charter at least annually; and

overseeing and reviewing our progress against our environmental, social and governance goals.
We believe that the functioning of our nominating and corporate governance committee complies with all applicable SEC and Nasdaq rules and regulations. We intend to comply with future requirements to the extent they become applicable to us.
The nominating and corporate governance committee believes that candidates for director should have certain minimum qualifications, including the highest personal integrity and ethics, the ability to read and understand basic financial statements, and being older than 21. The nominating and corporate governance committee also intends to consider such factors as possessing relevant expertise upon which to be able to offer advice and guidance to management, having sufficient time to devote to our affairs, demonstrated excellence in his or her field, having the ability to exercise sound business judgment and having the commitment to rigorously represent the long-term interests of our stockholders. However, the nominating and corporate governance committee retains the right to modify these qualifications from time to time. Candidates for director nominees are reviewed in the context of the current composition of the board of directors, the operating requirements of Progyny and the long-term interests of our stockholders.
In conducting this assessment, the nominating and corporate governance committee typically considers diversity (including diversity of gender, ethnic background and country of origin), age, skills and such other factors as it deems appropriate, given the current needs of the board of directors and our business, to maintain a balance of knowledge, experience and capability. When considering candidates as potential members of the board, the board of directors and the nominating and corporate governance committee evaluates the candidates’ ability to contribute to such diversity. The board of directors assesses its effectiveness
 
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in this regard as part of its annual board and director evaluation process. The below board diversity matrix reflects certain self-reported statistics about the current 10 members of our board of directors.
Board Diversity Matrix (As of April 14, 2022)
Total Number of Directors
10
Female
Male
Non-Binary
Did Not Disclose
Gender
Part I: Gender Identity
Directors
3
7
0
Part II: Demographic Background
African American or Black
1
Alaskan Native or Native American
Asian
Hispanic or Latinx
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
White
2
7
Two or More Races or Ethnicities
LGBTQ+
1
Did Not Disclose Demographic Background
0
The nominating and corporate governance committee appreciates the value of thoughtful board refreshment, and regularly identifies and considers qualities, skills and other director attributes that would enhance the composition of the board of directors. In the case of incumbent directors whose terms of office are set to expire, the nominating and corporate governance committee reviews these directors’ overall service to Progyny during their terms, including the number of meetings attended, level of participation, quality of performance and any other relationships and transactions that might impair the directors’ independence. In the case of new director candidates, the nominating and corporate governance committee also determines whether the nominee is independent for Nasdaq purposes, which determination is based upon applicable Nasdaq listing standards, applicable SEC rules and regulations and the advice of internal and external counsel, if necessary. The nominating and corporate governance committee then uses its network of contacts to compile a list of potential candidates, but may also engage, if it deems appropriate, a professional search firm. The nominating and corporate governance committee conducts any appropriate and necessary inquiries into the backgrounds and qualifications of possible candidates after considering the function and needs of our board of directors. The nominating and corporate governance committee meets to discuss and consider the candidates’ qualifications and then selects a nominee for recommendation to the board of directors by majority vote.
The nominating and corporate governance committee will consider stockholder recommendations of director candidates, so long as they comply with applicable law and our amended and restated bylaws, which procedures are summarized below. The nominating and corporate governance committee will evaluate any director nominees received from stockholders in the same manner as recommendations received from management or members of our board of directors.
Stockholders who wish to recommend individuals for consideration by the nominating and corporate governance committee to become nominees for election to our board of directors may do so by delivering a written recommendation to the nominating and corporate governance committee at the following address: 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018, Attn: General Counsel at least 120 days prior to the anniversary date of the mailing of our proxy statement for the preceding year’s annual meeting of stockholders. Submissions must include as to each proposed nominee, among other things, the name, age, business address and residence address of such nominee, the principal occupation or employment of such nominee, details regarding such nominee’s ownership of our capital stock, and such other information as would be required to be disclosed in a proxy statement soliciting proxies for the election of such nominee. Any such submission must be accompanied by the written consent of the proposed nominee to be named as
 
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a nominee and to serve as a director, if elected, and must also include information regarding the stockholder making such nomination, as specified in our amended and restated bylaws. You should refer to our amended and restated bylaws for a complete description of the required procedures for nominating a candidate to our board of directors.
Stockholder Communications with our Board of Directors
Our board of directors has adopted a formal process by which stockholders may communicate with the board or any of its directors. Stockholders who wish to communicate with our board of directors may do so by sending written communications addressed to our Secretary at 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018, Attn: General Counsel. Our Secretary will review each communication and will forward such communication to the board of directors or any of its directors to whom the communication is addressed, unless the communication contains advertisements or solicitations or is unduly hostile, threatening or similarly inappropriate. Communications deemed by the Secretary to be inappropriate for presentation will still be made available to any non-management director upon such director’s request.
Code of Conduct
We have adopted the Progyny, Inc. Code of Conduct that applies to all officers, directors, employees and outside labor, including independent contractors and consultants. The Code of Conduct is available on our website at investors.progyny.com. If we make any substantive amendments to the Code of Conduct or grant any waiver from a provision of the Code of Conduct to any executive officer or director, we will promptly disclose the nature of the amendment or waiver on our website. We granted no waivers in fiscal 2021.
Anti-Hedging Policy
Our board of directors has adopted an Insider Trading Policy, which applies to all of our directors, officers, employees, and designated consultants, as well as such persons’ immediate family, persons with whom such persons share a household, persons who are such persons’ economic dependents, and, unless otherwise determined by us, any other individuals or entities whose transactions in securities such persons influence, direct, or control (including, e.g., a venture or other investment fund, if such persons influence, direct, or control transactions by the fund). The Insider Trading Policy prohibits hedging or monetization transactions, including through the use of financial instruments such as prepaid variable forwards, equity swaps, collars, and exchange funds.
 
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PROPOSAL 2
RATIFICATION OF ERNST & YOUNG LLP AS OUR
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
The audit committee of our board of directors has selected Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022 and has further directed that management submit the selection of its independent registered public accounting firm for ratification by the stockholders at the Annual Meeting. In executing its responsibilities, the audit committee engages in an annual evaluation of Ernst & Young LLP’s qualifications, performance and independence, and considers whether continued retention of them as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm is in the best interest of the Company. While Ernst & Young LLP has been retained as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm continuously since 2012, in accordance with SEC rules and Ernst & Young LLP’s policies, the firm’s lead engagement partner rotates every five years. Representatives of Ernst & Young LLP are expected to be present virtually at the Annual Meeting. They will have an opportunity to make a statement if they so desire and will be available to respond to appropriate questions.
Neither the amended and restated bylaws nor other governing documents or law require stockholder ratification of the selection of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm. However, the audit committee is submitting the selection of Ernst & Young LLP to the stockholders for ratification as a matter of good corporate practice. If the stockholders fail to ratify the selection, the audit committee will reconsider whether or not to retain that firm. Even if the selection is ratified, the audit committee in its discretion may direct the appointment of different independent auditors at any time during the year if they determine that such a change would be in the best interests of Progyny and our stockholders.
The affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the matter at the Annual Meeting will be required to ratify the selection of Ernst & Young LLP.
Principal Accountant Fees And Services
The following table represents aggregate fees billed to us by Ernst & Young LLP for the periods set forth below.
Fiscal Year Ended
2021
2020
(in thousands)
Audit Fees(1)
$700
$775
Audit-related Fees(2)
Tax Fees(3)
119
112
All Other Fees(4)
  —
   4
Total Fees
$819
$891
(1)
For 2021 and 2020, consists of fees billed for professional services provided in connection with the audit of our annual financial statements, the review of our quarterly financial statements, and audit services that are normally provided by independent registered public accounting firm in connection with regulatory filings.
(2)
There were no such fees billed for 2021 or 2020.
(3)
For 2021, consists of fees billed for tax compliance work, a Section 382 study with respect to net operating loss carryforwards, a Nexus study, a transfer pricing study, and various other tax advisory services. For 2020, consists of fees billed related to tax compliance work, a Section 382 study with respect to net operating loss carryforwards, a qualified small business stock assessment, and various other tax advisory services.
(4)
There were no such fees billed for 2021. For 2020, consists of fees related to publications and online subscriptions/content.
 
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Pre-Approval Policies And Procedures
The audit committee has adopted a policy and procedures for the pre-approval of audit and non-audit services rendered by our independent registered public accounting firm, Ernst & Young LLP. The policy generally permits pre-approval of specified services in the defined categories of audit services, audit-related services, tax services and permitted non-audit services. Pre-approval may also be given as part of the audit committee’s approval of the scope of the engagement of the independent registered public accounting firm or on an individual, explicit, case-by-case basis before the independent registered public accounting firm is engaged to provide each service. The pre-approval of services may be delegated to one or more of the audit committee’s members, but any pre-approval decision made pursuant to such delegation must be reported to the full audit committee at its next scheduled meeting.
The audit committee has determined that the rendering of services other than audit services by Ernst & Young LLP is compatible with maintaining the principal accountant’s independence.
Our Board of Directors Unanimously Recommends A Vote FOR The Ratification of Ernst & Young LLP As Our Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm For The Year Ending December 31, 2022.
 
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PROPOSAL 3
APPROVAL, ON AN ADVISORY (NON-BINDING) BASIS, OF
THE COMPENSATION OF OUR NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
In accordance with the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 and Rule 14a-21 under the Exchange Act, the Company requests that our stockholders cast a non-binding, advisory vote to approve the compensation of our named executive officers. This proposal, commonly known as a “say-on-pay” proposal, gives our stockholders the opportunity to express their views on our named executive officers’ compensation. This vote is not intended to address any specific item of compensation, but rather the overall compensation of our named executive officers and the philosophy, policies and practices described in this proxy statement.
Accordingly, we ask our stockholders to vote “FOR” the following resolution at the Annual Meeting:
“RESOLVED, that the stockholders of Progyny, Inc. approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation paid to Progyny, Inc.’s named executive officers, as disclosed in this Proxy Statement for the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which disclosure includes the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the compensation tables, and the accompanying narrative discussion.”
We believe that our compensation programs and policies for the year ended December 31, 2021 were an effective incentive for the achievement of the Company’s goals, aligned with stockholders’ interest and worthy of stockholder support. Additional details concerning how we structure our compensation programs to meet the objectives of our compensation program are provided in the section titled “Executive Compensation” set forth in this proxy statement.
The next “say-on-pay” advisory vote following this one will occur at the 2023 annual meeting of stockholders.
The affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of shares present by virtual attendance or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on the matter is required to approve, on an advisory (non-binding) basis, the compensation of our named executive officers.
Because your vote is advisory, it will not be binding upon the board, nor will it create or imply any change in the duties of the Company, our board of directors or our Compensation Committee. However, the board values stockholders’ opinions and the Compensation Committee will consider the outcome of the advisory vote when considering future executive decisions. The board values constructive dialogue on executive compensation and other significant governance topics with the Company’s stockholders and encourages all stockholders to vote their shares on this important matter.
Our Board of Directors Unanimously Recommends A Vote FOR The Approval, On An Advisory (Non-Binding) Basis, Of The Compensation Of Our Named Executive Officers.
 
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EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
The following table sets forth, for our executive officers, their ages and position held with us as of the date of this proxy statement:
Name
Age
Principal Position
David Schlanger
62 Executive Chairman
Peter Anevski
54 Chief Executive Officer and Director
Jennifer Bealer
41
Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
Mark Livingston
56 Chief Financial Officer
Michael Sturmer
45 President
Biographical information for each of David Schlanger and Peter Anevski is included above with the director biographies under the caption “Information Regarding Director Nominees and Current Directors.”
Jennifer Bealer has served as our Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary since October 2017. Prior to that, she was an Associate at the law firm Ropes & Gray’s nationally-ranked healthcare practice from November 2010 to October 2017, where she gained extensive expertise in providing healthcare clients with strategic, regulatory, compliance and transaction advice. Ms. Bealer holds a B.S. in Biology and Psychology from the Pennsylvania State University and received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, A.L.M from Harvard University, and Master of Bioethics from University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. On April 12, 2022, Ms Bealer tendered her resignation, effective as of May 31, 2022.
Mark Livingston has served as our Chief Financial Officer since September 2020. Previously, Mr. Livingston had served as our Executive Vice President of Finance from May 2019 to September 2020. Prior to that, he served as Chief Financial Officer of the International Business at Scripps Network Interactive, a media company, where he worked from August 2010 to April 2018, and as Chief Financial Officer of Emerson, Reid & Company, an employee benefits wholesaler, from June 2007 to August 2010. Previously, Mr. Livingston has held senior financial leadership roles at WebMD and Hess Corporation. Mr. Livingston received his B.S. from Tulane University and is a licensed Certified Public Accountant.
Michael Sturmer has served as our President since January 1, 2022 and was previously Executive Vice President, Chief Growth and Strategy Officer from February 2021 to December 2021. Mr. Sturmer has over two decades of operations, sales and strategic experience in the healthcare industry. From September 2016 to February 2021, he was Senior Vice President of Health Services at Livongo. Prior to that, Mr. Sturmer held several senior positions at Cigna, including Chief Operating Officer for the New York/New Jersey Health Plan. Mr. Sturmer received his B.A. degree in Health Administration from Quinnipiac University.
 
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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Compensation Discussion and Analysis
2021 Business Highlights
The following are some of our key 2021 financial and performance highlights:

Our clinical outcomes with respect to single embryo transfer rates, pregnancy rate, miscarriage rate, live birth rate and IVF multiples rate remained superior to national averages.

By becoming an even more present resource for our members in 2021, our industry-leading Net Promoter Score, or NPS, increased to +81, the highest level we have achieved.

We had our most successful sales season ever, which is the most important driver of our long-term growth, by adding a record 85 new clients and 1.2 million new covered lives.

We achieved 2021 revenues of over $500 million despite disruptions to our business due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related variants.

For the full year, revenue grew 45% despite disruptions to our business due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related variants.
In this Compensation Discussion and Analysis (“CD&A”) set forth below, we provide an overview and analysis of the compensation awarded to or earned by our named executive officers identified in the Summary Compensation Table below during 2021, including the elements of our compensation program for named executive officers, material compensation decisions made under that program for 2021 and the material factors considered in making those decisions. Our named executive officers for the year ended December 31, 2021, which consist of our principal executive officer, our principal financial officer and our three most other highly compensated executive officers for fiscal year 2021 (collectively, the “named executive officers”) are:

David Schlanger, who served as Chief Executive Officer (and was our principal executive officer) through December 31, 2021;

Peter Anevski, who served as President and Chief Operating Officer through December 31, 2021 and currently serves as our principal executive officer;

Mark Livingston, who serves as Chief Financial Officer and is our principal financial officer;

Jennifer Bealer, who serves as Executive Vice President and General Counsel (on April 12, 2022, she tendered her resignation, effective as of May 31, 2022); and

Lisa Greenbaum, who served as Executive Vice President and Chief Client Officer through April 19, 2021.
Effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Schlanger transitioned to the role of Executive Chairman and Mr. Anevski transitioned to the role of Chief Executive Officer. Ms. Greenbaum resigned from her employment effective April 19, 2021.
This section also describes the actions and decisions of our compensation committee as it relates to fiscal 2021 compensation decisions. Where relevant, the discussion below also reflects certain contemplated changes to our compensation structure that occurred after fiscal 2021 but before our Annual Meeting.
Details of our Compensation Program
Compensation Philosophy, Objectives and Design
Philosophy.   We are focused on our mission of making dreams of parenthood come true through healthy, timely and supported fertility journeys. We believe that we are still in the early stages of this journey and that for us to be successful, we must hire and retain a talented team of individuals who can help achieve this mission through the successful pursuit of our company priorities. We have provided compensation
 
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packages that we view as fair and competitive and that are designed to incentivize our executives to drive superior performance, as our ability to meet and exceed our business goals depends on the skills and contributions of each executive.
Historically, our compensation programs for our executives have been weighted towards rewarding both short- and long-term performance incentives through a mix of cash and equity compensation, providing our executives with an opportunity to share in the appreciation of our business over time. Following our initial public offering, we have continued emphasizing pay for performance and compensation that is “at risk.” We also intend to maintain a commitment to strong corporate governance and best practice as we design and implement compensation programs for our executives.
Objectives.   Our compensation program for our named executive officers is built to support the following objectives:

Attract and retain highly qualified and productive executives

Provide a competitive total pay opportunity

Motivate executives to reach short-term and long-term company goals

Align executive pay with stockholder interest through equity awards with multi-year vesting
Design.   Our executive compensation program has been designed to motivate, reward, attract and retain high caliber management deemed essential to ensure our success. The program seeks to align executive compensation with our short-and long-term objectives, business strategy and financial performance.
What We Do
What We Don’t Do

Deliver a significant portion of executive compensation through long-term equity to align interests with stockholders
X
No pledging or hedging of Progyny stock

Engage an independent compensation consultant
X
No excessive perquisites

Benchmark certain pay against industry peers to offer market-competitive compensation
X
No supplemental executive retirement plans

Set challenging company metrics and targets
X
No compensation-related tax gross-ups

Conduct an annual executive compensation review
X
No incentives that encourage excessive risk- taking
Determination of Compensation/Compensation Practices
The compensation committee administers the executive compensation program relating to the compensation of our executive officers, including our named executive officers. The compensation committee annually reviews and approves the compensation of our executives and the cash and equity incentive plans, including setting corporate goals and objectives upon which the executive compensation program is based, or recommends it for approval to the board of directors. The compensation committee evaluates our named executive officers’ performance in light of these goals and objectives.
We expect that our compensation committee will continue to make future compensation decisions with respect to our named executive officers. In making executive compensation determinations for 2021, we relied on a variety of factors, including compensation data from market survey data published by third parties for use as a general indicator of relevant market conditions and pay practices.
Role of Chief Executive Officer
At the request of the compensation committee, our Chief Executive Officer made recommendations to the compensation committee to assist in determining 2021 compensation levels of the other named executive officers other than with respect to his own compensation. The compensation committee considers the Chief Executive Officer’s evaluation and his direct knowledge of each named executive officer’s performance
 
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and contributions when making compensation decisions. However, the ultimate decisions regarding 2021 executive compensation were made by the compensation committee.
Role of Compensation Consultant
Our board of directors retained Willis Towers Watson, an independent compensation consultant, in April 2020 to provide advisory services to the compensation committee regarding executive compensation matters, including for 2021. The compensation committee has determined that Willis Towers Watson is independent and that there is no conflict of interest resulting from retaining Willis Towers Watson.
When making compensation decisions in 2021, the compensation committee analyzed market data for executive compensation focusing on the benchmarking analysis and market data provided by Willis Towers Watson. Our peer group review took into account multiple factors in which we selected companies that were similar in size (primarily revenue), in the healthcare industry, including healthcare services, healthcare technology and managed healthcare, and with similar direction on industry and business strategy.
In particular, for 2021 compensation determinations, the compensation committee reviewed compensation data from the public filings for the following companies, which did not change from the peer group used for 2020 compensation:
Apollo Medical Holding Inc. Healthstream Inc.
Benefitfocus, Inc. HMS Holdings Corp
Care.com, Inc. National Research Corp
Castlight Health Inc. NextGen Healthcare Inc.
Corvel Corp Tabula Rasa Healthcare Inc.
Digirad Corp Teladoc Health Inc.
Evolent Health Inc. Tivity Health Inc.
HeathEquity Inc. Wageworks, Inc.
Use of Peer Group
The compensation committee reviewed our named executive officer compensation against this peer group to ensure that our named executive officer compensation is competitive and sufficient to recruit and retain our named executive officers. While we sought to benchmark cash compensation for our named executive officers to approximately the 50th percentile of our peer group, the compensation committee considered this data as only one factor in its compensation determination process. Compensation data from public filings of companies in our peer group formed the basis of the competitive benchmarking analysis and pay mix comparison.
Stockholder Input on Executive Compensation
In 2021, we held the first stockholder vote to determine the frequency of future stockholder advisory votes on our executive compensation program. An overwhelming majority of our stockholders voted in favor of holding such votes on an annual basis and following such advisory vote and taking into account the views of our stockholders, the board of directors determined that “say on pay” votes would be held on an annual basis.
Elements of Executive Compensation
Our executive officer compensation packages generally include:

Base salary;

Performance-based cash incentives; and

Equity-based compensation.
We believe that our compensation mix supports our objective of focusing on at-risk compensation having significant financial upside based on our performance relative to company priorities. We expect to
 
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continue to emphasize equity awards because of the direct link that equity compensation provides between stockholder interests and the interests of our executive officers, thereby motivating our executive officers to focus on increasing our value over the long term.
Our 2021 equity program provided for awards in stock options and restricted stock units. Commencing for 2022, we also approved performance stock unit (“PSU”) grants for certain of our named executive officers, which represent a multi-year compensation structure that promotes retention and incentivizes commitment to the long-term operating results of the Company. At this point in our growth cycle, a significant portion of the total compensation of our executive officers is directly tied, through the use of stock options, restricted stock units and PSUs, to the growth and long-term success of our Company.
Base Salary
The base salaries of our named executive officers are an important part of their total compensation package, and are intended to reflect their respective positions, duties and responsibilities. The compensation committee reviews executive officer base salaries each year (or otherwise at the time of a new hire or promotion) and makes any adjustments it deems necessary. In setting base salaries, the compensation committee considers changes in responsibilities, individual performance, tenure in position, internal pay equity, Company performance, market data for individual in similar positions and advice from our independent compensation consultant. The compensation committee gives no specific weighting to any one factor in setting the level of base salary and the process ultimately relies on the subjective exercise of the compensation committee’s judgment. We intend to continue to evaluate the mix of base salary, short-term incentive compensation and long-term incentive compensation to appropriately align the interests of our named executive officers with those of our stockholders.
The following table sets forth the base salaries of our named executive officers for 2021, which remained at the same levels as in 2020:
Named Executive Officer
Fiscal 2021 Base
Salary
David Schlanger
$ 500,000
Peter Anevski
$ 425,000
Mark Livingston
$ 425,000
Jennifer Bealer
$ 300,000
Lisa Greenbaum
$ 113,751(1)
(1)
Amount has been pro-rated to reflect the amount Ms. Greenbaum’s received though her resignation from the Company, which was effective as of April 19, 2021. Ms. Greenbaum was entitled to an annual base salary of $325,000 for 2021.
In connection with their executive transition, effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Schlanger’s base salary was reduced to $250,000 and Mr. Anevski’s base salary was increased to $500,000 to reflect their new roles.
Bonuses
We consider annual cash incentive bonuses to be an important component of our total compensation program and they provide incentives necessary to retain executive officers. Each named executive officer is eligible to receive an annual performance-based cash bonus based on a specified target annual bonus award amount, expressed as a percentage of the named executive officer’s base salary. Payments to our named executive officers under our bonus plan are determined by our compensation committee based, in the case of our named executive officers other than our Chief Executive Officer, on recommendations made by our Chief Executive Officer, considering each officer’s contributions to Company performance and also measured against their own defined job responsibilities.
In 2021, our named executive officers participated in our annual cash incentive bonus program at the following target percentages of base salary as of December 31, 2021, which remained at the same level as in 2020:
 
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Named Executive Officer
Target Percentage
Salary
David Schlanger
75%
Peter Anevski
75%
Mark Livingston
60%
Jennifer Bealer
40%
Lisa Greenbaum(1)
N/A
(1)
Ms. Greenbaum was not eligible to receive an annual bonus with respect to 2021 due to her resignation from employment with us.
Short-term incentive payments for our named executive officers are based on the attainment of company-wide operational objectives and an individualized leadership assessment of each executive, as assessed by the compensation committee.
Payments Under Our 2021 Bonus Program
For 2021, we operated an annual cash-based incentive program for eligible employees, including our named executive officers, pursuant to which participants could receive bonuses based on the achievement of certain Company operational and strategic performance metrics (the “2021 Bonus Program”). Under the 2021 Bonus Program the compensation committee assesses whether or not the applicable performance goals have been met or exceeded, and based on such performance assessment and individualized executive performance assessment, determines payout levels for named executive officers based on their respective target bonus opportunities. Based on the compensation committee’s assessment, the actual payout amounts may be higher than the target opportunity.
2021 Bonus Program Performance Objectives
The 2021 Bonus Program included a variety of specified operational and strategic performance criteria. At the time these objectives were set, the board of directors felt that they were rigorous yet achievable incentive targets for management.
The compensation committee used the measures set forth below in order to determine performance achievement with respect to 2021 bonuses.
Performance Metric/Goal
Actual
Assessment
Sales and Account Management – grow client base, upsells to existing clients and client retention
Despite disruption due to COVID-19, entered 2022 with a large contractual backlog of estimated annual revenues
Exceeds expectations
Clinical Outcomes and Scientific Leadership – generate industry leading clinical outcomes that exceed national averages
All clinical outcomes substantially exceeded most recently reported national averages and are industry leading
Exceeds expectations
Member Services – continue to improve and refine the member experience to maintain competitive differentiation
NPS score of 81+ by year-end and average member satisfaction survey score of 4.9 out of 5
Exceeds expectations
Provider Network and Relations – continue to have a high quality network and maintain unique collaborative relationship with network providers
Continued to grow network and created clinic watch lists to ensure alignment with high standards
Meets expectations
 
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Performance Metric/Goal
Actual
Assessment
Organization – maintain the unique mission-driven and collaborative culture
Positive results from employee engagement survey and low attrition
Exceeds expectations
Strategic – determine priority areas for growth
Determined priority areas for board’s consideration, including male infertility services, PGNY among fastest ever from IPO to S&P400
Exceeds expectations
2021 Bonus Payout Results
Name
Target
Overall Assessment
Actual Bonus Payout
David Schlanger
$ 375,000
Meets expectations
$ 350,000
Peter Anevski
$ 318,750
Exceeds expectations
$ 350,000
Mark Livingston
$ 255,000
Meets expectations
$ 255,000
Jennifer Bealer
$ 120,000
Exceeds expectations
$ 150,000
Lisa Greenbaum
N/A
N/A
N/A
The actual amounts earned under the 2021 Bonus Program are set forth below in the column of the Summary Compensation Table titled “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation.”
In connection with their executive transition, effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Schlanger’s and Mr. Anevski’s target bonus opportunities were each increased to 100% of their base salaries respectively to reflect their new roles and the changes made to their base salaries effective. For 2022, the bonus opportunity for all executives will be limited to 200% of the accrued bonus potential.
Equity Awards/Stock Plans
We view equity-based compensation as a critical component of our balanced total compensation program which establishes a performance-oriented culture at the Company for all levels of employees, including our executives. Equity-based compensation creates an ownership culture among our employees that provides an incentive to contribute to the continued growth and development of our business and aligns interest of executives with those of our stockholders. Our current equity program provides for awards in stock options, restricted stock units, and, as of 2022, PSUs. We rely on these long-term equity awards to attract, motivate, and retain an outstanding executive team and to ensure a strong connection between our executive compensation program and the long-term interests of our stockholders. We do not currently have any formal policy for determining the number of equity-based awards to grant to named executive officers. Our compensation committee reviews and considers data provided by Willis Towers Watson in its assessment of our long-term incentive program.
The following table sets forth the aggregate number of stock options and restricted stock units granted to our named executive officers in the 2021 fiscal year.
Named Executive Officer
2021 Stock Options
Granted
2021 RSUs Granted
Mark Livingston
270,000 82,000
Jennifer Bealer
135,000 37,000
Lisa Greenbaum
20,000 7,000
On March 3, 2021 each of Mr. Livingston, Ms. Bealer and Ms. Greenbaum received grants of 20,000 options at an exercise price of $42.78 and 7,000 restricted stock units as part of the Company’s annual 2020 merit grant process. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of February 26, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each quarterly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
 
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In addition, on September 1, 2021 Mr. Livingston received special one-time grants of 250,000 options at an exercise price of $56.29 and 75,000 restricted stock units, that were intended to reflect his newly promoted position as Chief Financial Officer. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of September 1, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each quarterly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date; and on November 8, 2021, Ms. Bealer received additional grants of 115,000 options at an exercise price of $66.66 and 30,000 restricted stock units as part of the Company’s 2021 merit grant process. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of November 8, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each monthly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
Messrs. Schlanger and Anevski did not receive any equity awards during fiscal 2021 and had not received any equity awards since 2019. Rather, in connection with the transition of their roles and in order to continue to retain and incentivize these key executives given that the significant majority of their outstanding equity awards were fully vested, on January 1, 2022 Messrs. Schlanger and Anevski received grants of 333,000 and 1,000,000 options at an exercise price of $50.35, 84,000 and 250,000 restricted stock units, and 83,000 and 250,000 PSUs, respectively. Each such option and restricted stock unit award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of January 1, 2022 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each quarterly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date. The PSUs vest and are earned, if at all, in two equal tranches in the event that specified sustained revenue targets are achieved (as determined by the compensation committee). The first tranche of PSUs vests if a certain rigorous revenue target amount is sustained over any four consecutive fiscal quarters between the grant date and the fifth anniversary of the grant date and the second tranche of PSUs vests if a certain “stretch” revenue goal target amount is sustained over any four consecutive fiscal quarters between the grant date and the fifth anniversary of the grant date, in each case subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date. Each tranche of PSUs may be earned at any point prior to the fifth anniversary of the grant date; provided that if either or both tranches have not been earned prior to such date they will be forfeited for no consideration. The design of the PSUs serves to align certain of our key executives’ interests with those of long-term stockholders, incentivize the achievement of sustained and strong Company financial performance and create retentive value.
Other Company Compensation & Benefit Programs for Fiscal 2021
In addition to the annual and long-term compensation programs described above, we provided the named executive officers with benefits and limited perquisites consistent with those provided to other Company executives, as described below.
Comprehensive Benefits Package
We provide a competitive benefits package to all full-time employees, including the named executive officers, that includes health and welfare benefits, such as medical, dental, vision care, disability insurance and life insurance benefits.
Other Benefits and Perquisites
Lisa Greenbaum was provided with a housing allowance in 2021 and Mark Livingston received a relocation reimbursement due to their primary residence being outside of New York. Such benefits were provided to aid in the performance of their respective duties and to provide competitive compensation with executives with similar positions and levels of responsibilities who are primarily based in other cities as we recruited for key talent. We do not expect to pay any housing allowances or relocation amounts to our executives for 2022.
We do not generally provide any tax “gross ups” to our named executive officers.
 
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401(k) Plan
We maintain a 401(k) plan that provides eligible U.S. employees with an opportunity to save for retirement on a tax advantaged basis. Eligible employees are able to defer eligible compensation up to certain Code limits, which are updated annually. Currently, we match 50% of the contributions that eligible employees make to the 401(k) plan up to 6% of the employee’s eligible compensation. The 401(k) plan is intended to be qualified under Section 401(a) of the Code, with the related trust intended to be tax exempt under Section 501(a) of the Code. As a tax-qualified retirement plan, contributions to the 401(k) plan are deductible by us when made, and contributions and earnings on those amounts are not generally taxable to the employees until withdrawn or distributed from the 401(k) plan. We believe that providing a vehicle for tax-deferred retirement savings though our 401(k) plan, and making fully vested matching contributions, adds to the overall desirability of our executive compensation package and further incentivizes our employees, including our named executive officers, in accordance with our compensation policies.
In the future, we may provide different and/or additional compensation components, benefits and/or perquisites to our named executive officers to ensure that we provide a balanced and comprehensive compensation structure. We believe that it is important to maintain flexibility to adapt our compensation structure to properly attract, motivate and retain the top executive talent for which we compete. All future practices regarding compensation components, benefits and/or perquisites will be subject to periodic review by the compensation committee.
Employment Agreements
We are party to employment agreements with each of our named executive officers, described in “—Employment Arrangements” below.
Severance Benefits
Ms. Greenbaum resigned from her employment effective April 19, 2021 and as a result was not entitled to any severance or other benefits in connection with her resignation.
A detailed description of the applicable severance provisions contained in our named executive officer’s employment agreements is described in “— Employment Arrangements  —  Severance” below.
Other Matters
Tax and Accounting Considerations
Compensation Deductibility / Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code
Section 162(m) of the Code, as amended by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, generally prohibits executive compensation in excess of $1 million per year to be deducted by us as a compensation expense, unless it qualifies for transition relief (i.e. grandfathering) applicable to certain arrangements in place as of November 2, 2017. Under a Section 162(m) transition rule for compensation plans or agreements of corporations which are privately held and which become publicly held in an initial public offering, compensation paid under a plan or agreement that existed prior to the initial public offering will not be subject to Section 162(m) for a transition period following the initial public offering (the “Post-IPO Transition Period”). As of December 31, 2021, the Company continues to be in the Post-IPO Transition Period. The compensation committee has approved, and may continue to approve, compensation exceeding the $1 million limitation, including with respect to a portion of base salary, annual bonus and long-term incentives. While compensation tax deductions are relevant issues to consider, the compensation committee believes that stockholder interests are best served by not restricting flexibility in designing compensation programs, even though such programs may result in nondeductible compensation expenses for tax purposes.
Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code
Section 409A of the Code requires that “nonqualified deferred compensation” be deferred and paid under plans or arrangements that satisfy the requirements of the statute with respect to the timing of
 
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deferral elections, timing of payments and certain other matters. Failure to satisfy these requirements can expose employees and other service providers to accelerated income tax liabilities, penalty taxes and interest on their vested compensation under such plans. Accordingly, as a general matter, it is our intention to design and administer our compensation and benefits plans and arrangements for all of our employees and other service providers, including our named executive officers, so that they are either exempt from, or satisfy the requirements of, Section 409A of the Code.
Section 280G of the Internal Revenue Code
Section 280G of the Code disallows a tax deduction with respect to excess parachute payments to certain executives of companies that undergo a change in control. In addition, Section 4999 of the Code imposes a 20% penalty on the individual receiving the excess payment.
Parachute payments are compensation that is linked to or triggered by a change in control and may include, but are not limited to, bonus payments, severance payments, certain fringe benefits, and payments and acceleration of vesting from long-term incentive plans including stock options and other equity-based compensation. Excess parachute payments are parachute payments that exceed a threshold determined under Section 280G of the Code based on the executive’s prior compensation. In approving the compensation arrangements for our named executive officers in the future, the compensation committee will consider all elements of the cost to the Company of providing such compensation, including the potential impact of Section 280G of the Code. However, the compensation committee may, in its judgment, authorize compensation arrangements that could give rise to loss of deductibility under Section 280G of the Code and the imposition of excise taxes under Section 4999 of the Code when it believes that such arrangements are appropriate to attract and retain executive talent.
Accounting Standards
ASC Topic 718 requires us to calculate the grant date “fair value” of our stock-based awards using a variety of assumptions. ASC Topic 718 also requires us to recognize an expense for the fair value of equity- based compensation awards. Grants of =restricted stock units and performance units under our equity incentive award plans will be accounted for under ASC Topic 718. During the fourth quarter of 2016, we early adopted ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, and elected to account for forfeitures of awards as they occur. The compensation committee will regularly consider the accounting implications of significant compensation decisions, especially in connection with decisions that relate to our equity incentive award plans and programs. As accounting standards change, we may revise certain programs to appropriately align the accounting expense of our equity awards with our overall executive compensation philosophy and objectives.
Responsible Equity Grant Practices
Our equity grant practices ensure all grants are made on fixed grant dates and at exercise prices or grant prices equal to the fair market value of our Common Stock on such dates. Equity grants are awarded under our stockholder approved plans and we do not backdate, reprice or grant equity awards retroactively. Our stockholder approved equity plans prohibit repricing of awards or exchanges of underwater options for cash or other securities without stockholder approval.
 
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2021 SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE
The following table sets forth information concerning the compensation of our named executive officers for the year ended December 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.
Name and Principal Position during 2021
Year
Salary ($)
Bonus ($)(1)
Stock
Awards ($)(2)
Option
Awards
($)(2)
Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
($)(3)
All Other
Compensation
($)(4)
Total ($)
David Schlanger
Chief Executive Officer
2021 500,000 350,000 12,462 862,462
2020 500,000 125,000 350,000 12,312 987,312
2019 431,250 4,240,075 250,000 42,871 4,964,196
Peter Anevski President and Chief
Operating Officer
2021 425,000 350,000 10,770 785,770
2020 425,000 156,250 318,750 9,861 909,861
2019 375,000 3,865,951 250,000 30,714 4,251,665
Mark Livingston
Chief Financial Officer
2021 425,000 4,521,210 7,586,995 255,000 275,467 13,063,672
2020 389,776 127,812 299,760 94,529 207,188 132,230 1,251,295
Jennifer Bealer
Executive Vice President and General
Counsel
2021 300,000 2,299,260 4,309,487 150,000 10,170 7,068,917
2020 300,000 70,000 299,760 94,529 120,000 9,120 893,409
Lisa Greenbaum(5)
Executive Vice President and Chief
Client Officer
2021 113,751 299,460 438,920 26,054 878,185
2020 325,000 75,000 81,060 94,529 225,000 56,574 857,163
(1)
Amounts reflect special bonuses paid to each of our named executive officers in 2020 and adjustments to the cash performance bonus payouts made by our compensation committee in recognition of our named executive officers’ individual performance during 2020.
(2)
Amounts reported represent the aggregate grant date fair value of stock options and restricted stock units granted to our named executive officers in 2021, computed in accordance with ASC Topic 718, excluding the effect of forfeitures. The assumptions used in calculating the grant date fair value of the stock options and restricted stock units reported in this column are set forth in the notes to our audited consolidated financial statements included in the Annual Report. This amount does not reflect the actual economic value that may be realized by the executive officer.
(3)
Amounts shown represent the named executive officers’ total performance-based cash bonuses earned for 2021, 2020 and 2019, as applicable, based on the achievement of performance goals as determined by our compensation committee.
(4)
For Mr. Schlanger for 2021, this amount includes matching contributions to the 401(k) plan of $8,700 and payment of term life insurance premiums of $3,762. For Mr. Anevski for 2021, this amount includes matching contributions to the 401(k) plan of $8,700 and payment of term life insurance premiums of $2,070. For Mr. Livingston for 2021, this amount includes matching contributions to the 401(k) plan of $8,700; payment of term life insurance premiums of $2,451; cell phone reimbursements of $900; relocation reimbursements of $261,916; and HSA employer contributions equal to $1,500. For Ms. Bealer for 2021, this amount includes matching contributions to the 401(k) plan of $8,700; payment of term life insurance premiums of $570; and cell phone reimbursements of $900. For Ms. Greenbaum for 2021, this amount includes matching contributions to the 401(k) plan of $8,700; payment of term life insurance premiums of $492; cell phone reimbursements of $300; housing reimbursements of $16,000; and HSA employer contributions equal to $562.50.
(5)
Effective April 19, 2021, Ms. Greenbaum resigned from her employment with us.
 
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GRANTS OF PLAN-BASED AWARDS  —  FISCAL YEAR 2021
The following table shows all plan-based awards which the Company granted to the named executive officers during 2021.
Name
Grant Date
Threshold ($)
Target ($)
Maximum ($)
All Other
Stock
Awards:
Number of
Shares of
Stock or Units (#)
All Other
Option
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Options (#)
Exercise or
Base Price of
Option
Awards ($/Sh)
Grant Date
Fair Value of
Stock and
Option
Awards($)(1)
David Schlanger
   N/A 375,000(2)
Peter Anevski
N/A 318,750(2)
Mark Livingston
N/A 255,000(2)
03/03/21(3) 7,000 299,460
03/03/21(3) 20,000 42.78 438,920
09/01/21(4) 75,000 4,221,750
09/01/21(4) 250,000 56.29 7,148,075
Jennifer Bealer
N/A 120,000(2)
03/03/21(3) 7,000 299,460
03/03/21(3) 9,000 42.78 438,920
11/08/21(5) 30,000 1,999,800
11/08/21(5) 115,000 66.66 3,870,567
Lisa Greenbaum
N/A 325,000(2)
03/03/21(3) 7,000 299,460
03/03/21(3) 20,000 42.78 438,920
(1)
Amounts reported represent the aggregate grant date fair value of stock options and restricted stock units granted to our named executive officers in 2021, computed in accordance with ASC Topic 718, excluding the effect of forfeitures. The assumptions used in calculating the grant date fair value of the stock options and restricted stock units reported in this column are set forth in the notes to our audited consolidated financial statements included in the Annual Report. This amount does not reflect the actual economic value that may be realized by the executive officer.
(2)
These columns show the range of estimated payouts targeted for 2021 performance bonuses under our 2021 Bonus Program for our executive officers as described above in the section titled “Elements of Executive Compensation  —  Bonuses.” The actual cash bonus payments made in 2021 based on 2021 performance are set forth in the Summary Compensation Table in the column titled “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation.” Ms. Greenbaum was not eligible to receive an annual 2021 performance bonus due to her resignation from her employment with us.
(3)
On March 3, 2021, each of Mr. Livingston, Ms. Greenbaum and Ms. Bealer received a grant of 7,000 restricted stock units and 20,000 options to purchase shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $42.78 per share. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of February 26, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each quarterly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(4)
On September 1, 2021 Mr. Livingston received grants of 75,000 restricted stock units and 250,000 options at an exercise price of $56.29 per share. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of September 1, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each quarterly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
 
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(5)
On November 8, 2021, Ms. Bealer received a grant of 30,000 restricted stock units and 115,000 options to purchase shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $66.66 per share. Each such award vests as to 25% on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date of November 8, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments on each monthly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table and Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table
Employment Arrangements
We are party to employment agreements with each of our named executive officers. The arrangements generally provide for at-will employment without any specific term and set forth the named executive officer’s initial base salary, bonus potential, eligibility for employee benefits and severance benefits upon a qualifying termination of employment, subject to such employee executing a separation agreement with us.
David Schlanger
In September 2019, we entered into an amended and restated employment agreement with Mr. Schlanger, who served as Chief Executive Officer during 2021, and which was further amended and restated effective January 1, 2022 in connection with Mr. Schlanger’s transition to the role of Executive Chairman. Pursuant to his amended and restated agreement, Mr. Schlanger’s annual base salary decreased from $500,000 to $250,000 for 2022. Mr. Schlanger is also eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance and retention bonus of up to a maximum of 100% of his annual salary, which was increased from 75% of his annual salary.
Pursuant to his agreement, Mr. Schlanger will continue to be entitled to severance benefits in the event that he is terminated by us without “cause” or if Mr. Schlanger resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change of control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), such that he will be entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of 12 months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to 12 months following his termination, (4) 12 months of accelerated vesting of any of his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for 12 months following his termination. If Mr. Schlanger is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within two years following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then- unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. Good reason within two years of our acquisition includes resignation by Mr. Schlanger for any or no reason after the nine-month anniversary of the acquisition. If Mr. Schlanger resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his options will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. If Mr. Schlanger is terminated because of his disability, then his then-outstanding options will be exercisable for 12 months following his last day of employment. Mr. Schlanger’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post-termination obligations under his agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Peter Anevski
In September 2019, we entered into an amended and restated employment agreement with Mr. Anevski, our President, Chief Operating & Financial Officer, and which was further amended and restated effective January 1, 2022 in connection with Mr. Anevski’s transition to the role of Chief Executive Officer. Pursuant to his amended and restated agreement, Mr. Anevski’s annual base salary increased from $425,000 to $500,000 and Mr. Anevski is also eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance and retention bonus of up to a maximum of 100% of his annual salary for 2022, which was increased from 75% of his annual salary.
Pursuant to his agreement, Mr. Anevski will continue to be entitled to severance benefits in the event that he is terminated by us without “cause” or if he resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change of
 
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control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), such that he will be entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of 12 months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to 12 months following his termination, (4) 12 months of accelerated vesting of any of his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for 12 months following his termination. If Mr. Anevski is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within two years following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then- unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. Good reason within two years of our acquisition includes resignation by Mr. Anevski for any or no reason after the nine-month anniversary of the acquisition. If Mr. Anevski resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his equity awards will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. If Mr. Anevski is terminated because of his disability, then his then-outstanding options will be exercisable for 12 months following his last day of employment. Mr. Anevski’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post- termination obligations under his offer letter and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Mark Livingston
On May 24, 2019, we entered into an offer letter with Mr. Livingston providing for his position as Executive Vice President, Finance. Pursuant to this offer letter, Mr. Livingston was entitled to an annual base salary of $375,000 and was eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance bonus of up to a maximum of 50% of his annual salary. In addition, the offer letter provided for Mr. Livingston’s initial stock option grant of 333,003 options to be granted in connection with his commencement of employment with the Company.
Effective September 15, 2020, we entered into an amended and restated employment agreement with Mr. Livingston providing for his promotion to Chief Financial Officer. Pursuant to his agreement, Mr. Livingston is entitled to an annual base salary of $425,000 and is eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance and retention bonus of up to a maximum of 60% of his annual salary.
Pursuant to his agreement, if Mr. Livingston is terminated by us without “cause” or if Mr. Livingston resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change of control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), he is entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of six months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to six months following his termination, (4) six months of accelerated vesting of any of his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for six months following his termination. If Mr. Livingston is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within one year following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then-unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. If Mr. Livingston resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause or disability, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his equity awards will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. Mr. Livingston’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post-termination obligations under his employment agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Jennifer Bealer
On September 8, 2017, we entered into an employment agreement with Ms. Bealer as our Senior Vice President, General Counsel, which was effective on October 30, 2017. Pursuant to her agreement, Ms. Bealer is entitled to an annual base salary of $240,000 and is eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance bonus of up to a maximum of 25% of her annual salary. The agreement also provided for Ms. Bealer
 
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initial stock option grant of 110,001 options. On April 12, 2022, Ms. Bealer tendered her resignation, effective as of May 31, 2022. Ms. Bealer is not entitled to receive any severance payments or other benefits upon termination in connection with her resignation.
Lisa Greenbaum
On April 19, 2019, we entered into an employment agreement with Ms. Greenbaum, our Executive Vice President, Chief Client Officer, which was effective on June 10, 2019. Pursuant to her agreement, Ms. Greenbaum was entitled to an annual base salary of $325,000, was eligible to receive an annual discretionary performance bonus of up to a maximum of 100% of her annual salary and received a $30,000 signing bonus. The agreement also provided for Ms. Greenbaum’s initial stock option grant of 220,002 options and a monthly housing allowance of $4,000.
Pursuant to her agreement, if Ms. Greenbaum was terminated by us without “cause” or if Ms. Greenbaum resigned for “good reason,” she was entitled to: (1) continued payment of her then-current base salary for a period of nine months (increased to 12 months after the second anniversary of her start date) and (2) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to her under COBRA for up to nine months following her termination (increased to 12 months after the second anniversary of her start date). If Ms. Greenbaum resigned without good reason or was terminated for cause or disability, she would not have been entitled to any severance benefits, her equity awards would have no longer vested and all payments, other than those already earned, would have terminated. Ms. Greenbaum’s benefits were conditioned, among other things, on her complying with her post-termination obligations under her employment agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Ms. Greenbaum resigned from her employment effective April 19, 2021 and as a result was not entitled to any severance payments or other benefits in connection with her resignation.
 
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OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT 2021 FISCAL YEAR-END
The following table shows all outstanding equity awards held by the named executive officers as of December 31, 2021:
Option Awards
Stock Awards
Name
Grant Date
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options
(#)Exercisable
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Unexercisable
Option
Exercise Price
($)
Option
Expiration
Date
Number of
Shares or
Units of Stock
That Have Not
Vested (#)
Market Value
of Shares or
Units of Stock
That Have Not
Vested ($)(1)
David Schlanger
5/24/2019 1,207,723(2) 662,299(2) 3.9545 5/23/2029
8/17/2018 202,794(3) 1.5000 8/16/2028
8/4/2017 2,234,385(3) 0.9091 8/3/2027
Peter Anevski
5/24/2019 1,017,774(2) 603,862(2) 3.9545 5/23/2029
8/17/2018 34,042(3) 1.5000 8/16/2028
8/4/2017 472,107(3) 0.9091 8/3/2027
Mark Livingston
9/01/2021 250,000(4) 56.2900 08/31/2031
9/01/2021 75,000(4) 3,776,250
3/03/2021 20,000(5) 42.7800 03/02/2031
3/03/2021 7,000(5) 352,450
5/4/2020 5,000(6) 251,750
3/9/2020 1,126(7) 5,060(7) 23.1600 3/8/2030
3/9/2020 1,967(7) 99,038
6/4/2019 13,750(8) 116,877(8) 3.9545 6/3/2029
Jennifer Bealer
11/08/2021 115,000(9) 66.6600 11/07/2031
11/08/2021 30,000(9) 1,510,500
3/03/2021 20,000(5) 42.7800 03/02/2031
3/03/2021 7,000(5) 352,450
5/4/2020 5,000(6) 251,750
3/9/2020 563(7) 5,060(7) 23.1600 3/8/2030
3/9/2020 1,967(7) 99,038
5/24/2019 6,875(2) 54,438(2) 3.9545 5/23/2029
5/22/2019 1,265(2) 9,488(2) 3.9545 5/21/2029
Lisa Greenbaum(10)
(1)
For restricted stock unit awards, this value is based upon the closing stock price of our common stock of December 31, 2021 of $50.35.
(2)
Each such award vested as to 25% on May 23, 2020 (or March 20, 2020 for Ms. Bealer’s May 22nd grant) with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal monthly installments on each monthly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(3)
Each such award vested as to 25% on January 16, 2018 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal monthly installments on each monthly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(4)
Each such award will vest as to 25% on September 1, 2022 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
 
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(5)
Each such award vested as to 25% on February 26, 2022 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(6)
Each such award vested as to 25% on the first anniversary of October 25, 2020 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(7)
Each such award will vest as to 25% on March 9, 2021 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(8)
Each such award vested as to 25% on May 29, 2020 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal monthly installments on each monthly anniversary thereafter over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(9)
Each such award will vest as to 25% on November 8, 2022 with the remaining 75% of such award vesting in equal quarterly installments over the next three years, subject to the executive’s continued service through each applicable vesting date.
(10)
Ms. Greenbaum did not hold any outstanding equity awards as of December 31, 2021.
 
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OPTION EXERCISES AND STOCK VESTED — FISCAL YEAR 2021
The following table shows for 2021 the number of shares acquired upon exercise of option awards and the vesting of stock awards and the value realized upon such exercise and vesting.
Option Awards
Stock Awards
Name
Number of Shares
Acquired on
Exercise (#)(1)
Value Realized on
Exercise ($)(7)
Number of Shares
Acquired on
Vesting (#)(1)
Value Realized on
Vesting ($)(8)
David Schlanger
1,500,000 79,489,166
Peter Anevski
403,538 23,140,575
Mark Livingston
78,439(2) 4,689,959 4,033(3) 212,696
Jennifer Bealer
71,579(4) 3,658,585 4,033 212,696
Lisa Greenbaum
57,668(5) 2,829,553 876(6) 36,941
(1)
Represents the gross number of shares acquired on the exercise of options or vesting of restricted stock units, as applicable, without taking into account any shares withheld to satisfy applicable tax obligations.
(2)
After withholding shares sufficient to cover applicable taxes and fees upon the exercise of option awards, Mr. Livingston retained a total of 36,901 net shares.
(3)
After withholding shares sufficient to cover applicable taxes and fees upon the vesting of restricted stock units, Mr. Livingston retained a total of 2,280 net shares.
(4)
After withholding shares sufficient to cover applicable taxes and fees upon the exercise of option awards, Ms. Bealer retained a total of 49,335 net shares.
(5)
After withholding shares sufficient to cover applicable taxes and fees upon the exercise of option awards, Ms. Greenbaum retained a total of 27,831 net shares.
(6)
After withholding shares sufficient to cover applicable taxes and fees upon the vesting of restricted stock units, Ms. Greenbaum retained a total of 578 net shares.
(7)
Represents the value of the exercised stock options, calculated by multiplying (1) the number of vested options exercised by (2) the closing stock price from the previous trading day, less the exercise price of such options.
(8)
Represents the value of the vested restricted stock units, calculated by multiplying (1) the number of vested restricted stock units by (2) the closing stock price from the previous trading day.
SUMMARY OF POTENTIAL PAYMENTS AND BENEFITS — TERMINATION EVENTS
Overview
This section describes the benefits payable to our named executive officers in two circumstances:

Termination of Employment

Change in Control
Employment Agreements — Severance
David Schlanger
Pursuant to his employment agreement, if Mr. Schlanger is terminated by us without “cause” or if Mr. Schlanger resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change in control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), he is entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of 12 months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to 12 months following his termination, (4) 12 months of accelerated vesting of any of
 
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his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for 12 months following his termination. If Mr. Schlanger is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within two years following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then-unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. Good reason within two years of our acquisition includes resignation by Mr. Schlanger for any or no reason after the nine-month anniversary of the acquisition. If Mr. Schlanger resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his options will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. If Mr. Schlanger is terminated because of his disability, then his then-outstanding options will be exercisable for 12 months following his last day of employment. Mr. Schlanger’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post-termination obligations under his agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Peter Anevski
Pursuant to his employment agreement, if Mr. Anevski is terminated by us without “cause” or if Mr. Anevski resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change of control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), he is entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of 12 months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to 12 months following his termination, (4) 12 months of accelerated vesting of any of his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for 12 months following his termination. If Mr. Anevski is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within two years following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then-unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. Good reason within two years of our acquisition includes resignation by Mr. Anevski for any or no reason after the nine-month anniversary of the acquisition. If Mr. Anevski resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his equity awards will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. If Mr. Anevski is terminated because of his disability, then his then-outstanding options will be exercisable for 12 months following his last day of employment. Mr. Anevski’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post- termination obligations under his offer letter and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Mark Livingston
Pursuant to his employment agreement, if Mr. Livingston is terminated by us without “cause” or if Mr. Livingston resigns for “good reason” outside of the “change of control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in his agreement), he is entitled to: (1) continued payment of his then-current base salary for a period of six months, (2) payment of his current year target bonus, prorated based on completed months of service to the date of termination, as well as any bonus relating to the prior year to the extent earned as determined by our board of directors, (3) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to him under COBRA for up to six months following his termination, (4) six months of accelerated vesting of any of his then-unvested shares subject to outstanding equity awards and (5) his options remaining exercisable for six months following his termination. If Mr. Livingston is terminated without cause or resigns with good reason within one month prior to or within one year following our “acquisition” ​(referred to as the “change of control severance period”), he is entitled to the aforementioned payments and benefits, except that any then-unvested outstanding equity awards will become vested in their entirety as of the last day of his employment. If Mr. Livingston resigns without good reason or is terminated for cause or disability, he will not be entitled to any severance benefits, his equity awards will no longer vest and all payments, other than those already earned, will terminate. Mr. Livingston’s benefits are conditioned, among other things, on his complying with his post-termination obligations under his employment agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
 
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Lisa Greenbaum
Pursuant to her employment agreement, if Ms. Greenbaum was terminated by us without “cause” or if Ms. Greenbaum resigned for “good reason” outside of the “change of control severance period” ​(as those terms are defined in her agreement), she was entitled to: (1) continued payment of her then-current base salary for a period of nine months (increased to 12 months after the second anniversary of her start date) and (2) payment of premiums for continued health benefits to her under COBRA for up to nine months following her termination (increased to 12 months after the second anniversary of her start date). If Ms. Greenbaum resigned without good reason or was terminated for cause or disability, she would not have been entitled to any severance benefits, her equity awards would have no longer vested and all payments, other than those already earned, would have no longer terminated. Ms. Greenbaum’s benefits were conditioned, among other things, on her complying with her post termination obligations under her employment agreement and timely signing a general release of claims in our favor.
Ms. Greenbaum resigned from her employment without good reason effective April 19, 2021 and as a result, was not entitled to any severance payments or benefits in connection with her resignation.
Equity Plans
Pursuant to our 2017 Plan and 2019 Plan (as defined below), in the event any of our employees, including our executives, are terminated by reason of his or her death, such employee will be entitled to accelerated vesting of the then-unvested time-based awards.
 
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Summary of Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control
The following table summarizes the payments that would be made to our named executive officers upon the occurrence of certain qualifying terminations of employment or a change in control, in any case, occurring on December 31, 2021 (other than for Ms. Greenbaum, who was not employed with the Company on December 31, 2021 and did not receive any other severance payments or benefits in connection with her resignation in 2021). Amounts shown do not include (i) accrued but unpaid base salary through the date of termination, (ii) other benefits earned or accrued by the named executive officer during his employment that are available to all salaried employees, such as accrued vacation or acceleration of outstanding stock options and restricted stock units (unless the vesting is contingent on attainment of a performance condition).
Name
Benefit
Termination Without Cause or
for Good Reason / Cause (no
Change in Control) ($)
Termination Without Cause or
for Good Reason / Cause in
Connection with a Change in
Control ($)(7)
David Schlanger Cash 850,000(1) 850,000(1)
Equity Acceleration 21,690,175(3) 30,727,693(4)
All Other Payments or Benefits
28,723(5) 28,723(5)
Gross Up Payment
Total 22,568,898 31,606,416
Peter Anevski Cash 775,000(1) 775,000(1)
Equity Acceleration 19,776,314(3) 28,016,479(4)
All Other Payments or Benefits
42,107(5) 42,107(5)
Gross Up Payment
Total 20,593,421 28,833,586
Mark Livingston Cash 467,500(2) 467,500(2)
Equity Acceleration 2,186,996(3) 10,191,037(4)
All Other Payments or Benefits
31,228(5) 31,228(5)
Total 2,685,724 10,689,765
Jennifer Bealer(6) Cash
Equity Acceleration
All Other Payments or Benefits
Total
(1)
Represents payment equal to (1) 12 months of the executive’s base salary at termination for the year ended December 31, 2021 and (2) the executive’s full target bonus for such year of termination (without regard to proration assuming a termination date of December 31, 2021).
(2)
Represents payment equal to (1) six months of Mr. Livingston’s base salary at termination for the year ended December 31, 2021 and (2) Mr. Livingston’s full target bonus for such year of termination (without regard to proration assuming a termination date of December 31, 2021).
(3)
Represents the value of 12 months (or six months for Mr. Livingston) of unvested equity awards that would be subject to accelerated vesting, based upon the closing price of our common stock on December 31, 2021 of $50.35. With respect to Mr. Livingston, this value does not include the 250,000 unvested options Mr. Livingston holds that were granted on September 1, 2021, as such options have an exercise price that is less than the closing market price of our common stock on December 31, 2021 and as a result are underwater.
(4)
Represents the value of all unvested equity awards that would be subject to accelerated vesting, based upon the closing price of our common stock on December 31, 2021 of $50.35.
(5)
Represents the estimated costs of continuation of group health benefits for 12 months (or six months for Mr. Livingston) following the executive’s termination.
 
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(6)
Ms. Bealer is not entitled to any payments or benefits under her employment agreement upon a termination of her employment or the occurrence of a change in control.
(7)
Pursuant to their terms, the equity awards held by our named executive officers will not automatically accelerate in connection with a change in control unless they are not assumed or substituted in connection with such change in control. The values of any potential acceleration if the awards are not assumed or substituted would be as reflected in this column. In addition, as described above, pursuant to our 2017 Plan and 2019 Plan, in the event any of our employees, including our executives, are terminated by reason of his or her death, such employee will be entitled to accelerated vesting of the then-unvested time-based awards, with the equity acceleration values set forth in this column.
EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION
The following table summarizes our equity compensation plan information as of December 31, 2021. Information is included for equity compensation plans approved by our stockholders. We do not have any equity compensation plans not approved by our stockholders:
Plan Category
Number of Shares to
be issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
(#)
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
($)
Number of Shares
remaining available
for future issuance
under equity
compensation plans
(excluding shares
reflected in the first
column) (#)
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
17,254,882(1) $ 24.25 5,721,311(2)
Equity compensation plan not approved by security
holders
Total
17,254,882 $ 24.25 5,721,311
(1)
This amount includes the following:
(a)
14,924,013 shares to be issued upon the exercise of outstanding stock options, of which 131,718 were granted from the Progyny Inc. 2008 Stock Plan (the 2008 Stock Plan) with a weighted- average exercise price of $1.04, 8,439,032 were granted from the Progyny Inc. 2017 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended (the 2017 Plan) with a weighted-average exercise price of $3.00 and 6,353,236 were granted from the Progyny Inc. 2019 Equity Incentive Plan, as amended (the 2019 Plan) with a weighted-average exercise price of $54.97.
(b)
565,351 shares to be issued upon the exercise of outstanding common stock warrants with a weighted-average exercise price of $1.73.
(c)
1,765,518 shares subject to restricted stock units that were granted under the 2019 Plan. Since these awards have no exercise price, they are not included in the weighted-average exercise price calculation.
(2)
Includes 4,160,618 shares available for issuance under the 2019 Plan as of December 31, 2021. In October 2019, the Company’s Board of Directors and stockholders adopted and approved the 2019 Plan as the successor to continuation of the Company’s 2017 Plan. Under the 2019 Plan, an annual increase to the number of shares issuable is automatically added on January 1 of each year for a period of ten years commencing on January 1, 2020 and ending on (and including) January 1, 2029, in an amount equal to (i) 4% the total number of shares of common stock outstanding on December 31 of the preceding year or (ii) such lesser number of shares as the Board of Directors may provide.
Also includes 1,560,693 shares available for issuance under the ESPP as of December 31, 2021 (of which 19,838 shares were issued with respect to the purchase period in effect as of December 31, 2021, which purchase period ended on January 31, 2022). Under the ESPP, an annual increase to the number of shares issuable is automatically added on January 1 of each year from January 1, 2021 through January 1, 2029, by the lesser of (1) 1% of the total number of shares of our common stock
 
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outstanding on December 31 of the preceding calendar year, and (2) 2,500,000 shares; provided that prior to the date of any such increase, our Board of Directors may determine that such increase will be less than the amount set forth in clauses (1) and (2).
 
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DIRECTOR COMPENSATION
Non-Employee Director Compensation Policy
Our board of directors has adopted a non-employee director compensation policy, last amended in November 2021, which is designed to enable us to attract and retain, on a long-term basis, highly qualified non-employee directors. Under the policy, each non-employee director will be paid cash compensation as set forth below. All amounts for service as a chairperson of the board of directors or a committee thereof are in addition to the amount for service as a member of our board of directors.
Position
Annual Retainer
Board of Directors
$ 40,000
Board of Directors Independent Chair or Lead Independent Director
$ 25,000
Audit Committee Chair
$ 20,000
Compensation Committee Chair
$ 10,000
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Chair
$ 7,500
In addition, each of our non-employee directors will receive initial option grants in the amounts set forth below upon their election or appointment to our board of directors. All amounts for service as a chairperson of the board of directors or a committee thereof are in addition to the amount for service as a member of our board of directors.
Position
Initial Grant
Board of Directors
44,000
Board of Directors Independent Chair or Lead Independent Director
8,800
Audit Committee Chair
6,600
Compensation Committee Chair
4,400
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Chair
2,200
Under our non-employee director compensation policy, directors will also be eligible to receive annual equity awards comprising options and restricted stock units. In November 2021, the non-employee director compensation policy was amended so that commencing with the Company’s 2023 annual stockholder meeting, annual grants will be made at each annual meeting instead of each October and so that such annual grants are reflected as dollar values rather than a number of shares, with aggregate grant date values as set forth below, in each case which shall vest on the first anniversary of the grant date, subject to the director’s continued service through such date.
Position
Annual Committee
Grant (Options)
Annual Committee
Grant (RSUs)
Board of Directors
$ 338,587 $ 139,750
Board of Directors Independent Chair or Lead Independent Director
$ 54,174 $ 55,900
Audit Committee Chair
$ 40,631 $ 27,950
Compensation Committee Chair
$ 27,101 $ 27,950
Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Chair
$ 13,544 $ 27,950
Twenty-five percent (25%) of the shares underlying the initial option grant will vest on the first anniversary of the date of the initial election or appointment, with the remaining shares vesting in equal quarterly installments thereafter until the fourth anniversary of the date of initial election or appointment. All vesting of equity awards under our non-employee director compensation policy is subject to the director’s continuous service as of each applicable vesting date.
The following table sets forth information regarding the compensation earned by our non-employee directors for the year ended December 31, 2021.
 
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2021 DIRECTOR COMPENSATION TABLE
Name(5)
Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash ($)
Stock Awards
($)(1)
Option Awards
($)(1)
Total ($)
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.
$ 66,172(2) $ 195,572 $ 430,925 $ 692,669
Malissia Clinton
$ 37,452 $ 139,694 $ 371,493 $ 548,640
Fred Cohen, M.D., D.Phil.
$ 50,000(3) $ 167,633 $ 401,222 $ 618,855
Kevin Gordon
$ 40,000 $ 139,694 $ 371,493 $ 551,187
Roger Holstein
$ 37,452 $ 139,694 $ 371,493 $ 548,640
Jeff Park
$ 61,079(4) $ 167,633 $ 416,074 $ 644,786
Norman Payson, M.D.
$ 47,500 $ 167,633 $ 386,345 $ 601,478
Cheryl Scott
$ 40,000 $ 139,694 $ 371,493 $ 551,187
(1)
Amounts reported represent the aggregate grant date fair value of stock options and restricted stock units granted to our directors in 2021, computed in accordance with ASC Topic 718, excluding the effect of forfeitures. The assumptions used in calculating the grant date fair value of the stock options and restricted stock units reported in this column are set forth in note 10 to our audited consolidated financial statements included in the Annual Report. This amount does not reflect the actual economic value that may be realized by the director.
(2)
Pursuant to the director compensation policy, directors have the option to receive their annual cash compensation in the form of stock options. Dr. Seidenberg chose to have 100% of her retainer for the period 10/24/2020 to 10/23/2021 as well as for the period 10/24/2021 to 10/23/2022 paid in this manner. As such, the total fees earned for her service performed in 2021 includes 4,429 shares issuable upon the exercise of options. Of this amount, (i) 3,905 shares were granted on October 24, 2020 with an exercise price of $27.95 and fully vested on October 24, 2021, one year from grant; and (ii) 524 shares were granted on October 24, 2021 with an exercise price of $63.21 and fully vest on October 24, 2022, one year from grant. Additionally, on October 24, 2021 Dr. Seidenberg received 2,289 shares issuable upon the exercise of options as prepayment of fees to be earned in 2022. The terms of the award are the same as the October 24, 2021 awards noted above.
(3)
Pursuant to the director compensation policy, directors have the option to receive their annual cash compensation in the form of stock options. Dr. Cohen chose to have 50% of his retainer for the period 10/24/2020 to 10/23/2021 paid in this manner. As such, the total fees earned for service performed in 2021 includes 1,501 shares issuable upon the exercise of options. These awards fully vested on October 24, 2021 and have an exercise price of $27.95.
(4)
Pursuant to the director compensation policy, directors have the option to receive their annual cash compensation in the form of stock options. Mr. Park chose to have 100% of his retainer for the period 10/24/2020 to 10/23/2021 as well as for the period 10/24/2021 to 10/23/2022 paid in this manner. As such, the total fees earned for service performed in 2021 includes 4,088 shares issuable upon the exercise of options. Of this amount, (i) 3,605 shares were granted on October 24, 2020 with an exercise price of $27.95 and fully vested on October 24, 2021, one year from grant; and (ii) 483 shares were granted on October 24, 2021 with an exercise price of $63.21 and fully vest on October 24, 2022, one year from grant. Additionally, on October 24, 2021, Mr. Park received 2,113 shares issuable upon the exercise of options as prepayment of fees to be earned in 2022. The terms of the award are the same as the October 24, 2021 awards noted above.
(5)
Mr. Schlanger is not included in this table because he is an employee of the Company and received no additional compensation for his service as a director in 2021. The compensation received by Mr. Schlanger as an employee is shown in the Summary Compensation Table above.
The table below shows the aggregate numbers of option awards (exercisable and unexercisable) held as of December 31, 2021 by each non-employee director who was serving as of December 31, 2021.
 
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Name
Options Outstanding
at Fiscal Year End
(Exercisable)
Options Outstanding
at Fiscal Year End
(Unexercisable)
Restricted Stock
Units Outstanding at
Fiscal Year End(1)
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.
66,800 39,615 3,094
Malissia Clinton
11,000 47,658 2,210
Fred Cohen, M.D., D. Phil.
59,096 33,981 2,652
Kevin Gordon
48,833 34,825 2,210
Roger Holstein
11,000 47,658 2,210
Jeff Park
62,863 39,180 2,652
Norman Payson
95,225 35,043 2,652
Cheryl Scott
48,834 34,824 2,210
(1)
All restricted stock units were unvested as of December 31, 2021. They will fully vest on October 24, 2022, one year from date of grant.
CEO Pay Ratio
Pursuant to Section 953(b) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 402(u) of Regulation S-K, we are required to disclose the ratio of our Chief Executive Officer’s annual total compensation to the annual total compensation of our other employees.
The annual total compensation for 2021 for our Chief Executive Officer was $862,462, as reported in the Summary Compensation Table. The annual total compensation for 2021 for our median employee, identified as discussed below, was $100,779, calculated as explained below. Based on this information, for 2021, the ratio of the annual total compensation of our Chief Executive Officer to the median of the annual total compensation of our other employees was approximately 9 to 1.
Methodology, Assumptions and Estimates Used in Determining our Pay Ratio Disclosure
We chose December 31, 2021 as the date for establishing the employee population used in identifying the median employee and used calendar year 2021 as the measurement period. We identified the median employee using the consistently applied compensation measure of actual gross wages for each employee employed as of December 31, 2021 (other than our Chief Executive Officer). We captured all full-time, part-time, seasonal and temporary employees, consisting of approximately 354 individuals.
The annual total compensation of the median employee and the annual total compensation of the CEO were calculated in accordance with the requirements of Item 402(c)(2)(x) of Regulation S-K.
The pay ratio reported above is a reasonable estimate calculated in a manner consistent with SEC rules based on our internal records and the methodology described above. Because the SEC rules for identifying the median compensated employee and calculating the pay ratio based on that employee’s annual total compensation allow companies to adopt a variety of methodologies, to apply certain exclusions, and to make reasonable estimates and assumptions that reflect their employee populations and compensation practices, the pay ratio reported above should not be used as a basis for comparison between companies by other companies. In addition, we expect the Company’s annually reported pay ratio may vary significantly year over year, given the size of the Company and the potential variability in Company employee compensation.
 
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SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF
CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT
The following table sets forth certain information regarding the ownership of our common stock as of March 28, 2022 by:

each person or entity known by us to be beneficial owners of more than five percent of our common stock;

each of our directors;

each of our named executive officers; and

all of our executive officers and directors as a group.
We have determined beneficial ownership in accordance with the rules of the SEC. Under these rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares of common stock as to which the individual or entity has sole or shared voting power or investment power. In computing the number of shares beneficially owned by an individual or entity and the percentage ownership of that person, shares of common stock subject to options held by such person that are currently exercisable or will become exercisable within 60 days of March 28, 2022 are considered outstanding, although these shares are not considered outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of any other person.
Unless noted otherwise, the address of all listed stockholders is c/o Progyny, Inc., 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10018.
Each of the stockholders listed has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares beneficially owned by the stockholder unless noted otherwise, subject to community property laws where applicable.
Beneficial Ownership(1)
Beneficial Owner
Number of
Shares
Percent of
Total
Greater than 5% Stockholders
TPG Biotechnology Partners III, L.P.(2)
10,565,351 11.4%
BlackRock(3) 7,923,625 8.6%
Macquarie Group Limited(4)
7,471,794 8.1%
The Vanguard Group(5)
6,475,504 7.1%
KPCB Holdings, Inc., as nominee(6)
6,473,515 7.1%
Alger Associates, Inc.(7)
4,560,319 5.0%
Directors and Named Executive Officers
Peter Anevski(8)
1,992,592 2.1%
Jennifer Bealer(9)
75,788 *
Malissia Clinton(10)
16,500 *
Fred E. Cohen, M.D. D. Phil.(11)
70,137 *
Kevin Gordon(12)
58,416 *
Lisa Greenbaum(13)
2,112 *
Roger Holstein(14)
16,500 *
Mark Livingston(15)
51,875 *
Jeff Park(16)
73,446 *
Norman Payson, M.D.(17)
759,984 *
David Schlanger(18)
3,488,992 3.7%
Beth Seidenberg, M.D.(19)
6,780,721 7.4%
Cheryl Scott(20)
56,417 *
All executive officers and directors as a group (13 persons)(21)
13,678,790 14.0%
 
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*
Represents beneficial ownership of less than 1%.
(1)
This table is based upon information supplied by our officers, directors and principal stockholders and Schedules 13D and 13G (and amendments thereto) filed with the SEC. Unless otherwise indicated in the footnotes to this table and subject to community property laws where applicable, we believe that each of the stockholders named in this table has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares indicated as beneficially owned. Applicable percentages are based on 91,726,404 shares outstanding on March 28, 2022.
(2 )
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 11, 2022. Consists of (a) 10,000,000 shares and (b) warrants to purchase 565,351 shares held by TPG Biotechnology Partners III, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership. TPG GP A, LLC is the managing member of TPG Group Holdings (SBS) Advisors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which is the general partner of TPG Group Holdings (SBS), L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, which holds 100% of the shares of Class B common stock (which represents a majority of the combined voting power of the common stock) of TPG Inc., a Delaware corporation, which is the controlling shareholder of TPG GPCo, Inc., a Delaware corporation, which is the sole member of TPG Holdings I-A, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which is the general partner of TPG Operating Group I, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, which is the sole member of TPG Biotechnology GenPar III Advisors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, which is the general partner of TPG Biotechnology GenPar III, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, which is the general partner of TPG Biotechnology Partners III, L.P. TPG GP A, LLC is owned by entities owned by David Bonderman, James G. Coulter and Jon Winkelried. Because of the relationship of Messrs. Bonderman, Coulter and Winkelried to TPG GP A, LLC, each of Messrs. Bonderman, Coulter and Winkelried may be deemed to be the beneficial owners of the shares of Common Stock held TPG Biotech III. Messrs. Bonderman, Coulter and Winkelried disclaim beneficial ownership of such shares of Common Stock and Warrants held by TPG Biotech III except to the extent of their pecuniary interest therein. The address of TPG Biotechnology Partners III, L.P. is c/o TPG Global, LLC, 301 Commerce Street, Suite 3300, Fort Worth, Texas 76102.
(3)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 4, 2022, indicating that BlackRock, Inc. (“BlackRock”) had sole voting power with respect to 7,756,040 shares, shared voting power with respect to no shares, sole dispositive power with respect to 7,923,625 shares, and shared dispositive power with respect to no shares. The principal address of BlackRock is 1359 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York NY 10018.
(4)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 14, 2022. Consists of 7,353,708 shares held by Macquarie Investment Management Business Trust (“Macquarie Trust”) and 116,220 shares held by Ivy Investment Management Company (“Ivy”). The shares held by Macquarie Trust are deemed to be beneficially owned by Macquarie Management Holdings Inc. (“Macquarie Holdings”) due to its ownership of Macquarie Trust. The shares held by Macquarie Holdings and Macquarie Trust are deemed to be beneficially owned by Macquarie Group Limited (“Macquarie Group”) due to its ownership of Macquarie Holdings, Macquarie Trust, and Ivy. The principal business address of Macquarie Group is 50 Martin Place Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The principal business address of Macquarie Group is 50 Martin Place Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The principal business address of Macquarie Holdings and Macquarie Trust is 2005 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103. The principal business address of Ivy is 6300 Lamar Ave Overland Park, KS 66202.
(5)
Based on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 10, 2022, indicating that The Vanguard Group (“Vanguard”) had sole voting power with respect to no shares, shared voting power with respect to 120,962 shares, sole dispositive power with respect to 6,300,709 shares, and shared dispositive power with respect to 174,795 shares. The principal business address of Vanguard is 100 Vanguard Blvd., Malvern, PA 19355.
(6)
Based on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 11, 2022. Consists of 6,473,515 shares held by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers XIII, LLC (“KPCB XIII”). The managing member of KPCB XIII, KPCB XIII Associates, LLC (“KPCB XIII Associates”), may be deemed to have sole power to vote these shares. The principal business address for Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, LLC, is 2750 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
 
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(7)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 14, 2022. Consists of 4,560,319 shares held by one or more open-end investment companies or other managed accounts that are investment management clients of Fred Alger Management, LLC (“FAM”), a registered investment adviser, and Weatherbie Capital, LLC (“WC”), a registered investment adviser. Each of FAM and WC is a 100% owned subsidiary of Alger Group Holdings, LLC (“Alger LLC”), a holding company. Alger LLC is a 100% owned subsidiary of Alger Associates, Inc., a holding company. The principal business address of each of Alger Associates, Inc. is 100 Pearl Street, 27th Floor, New York, NY 10004.
(8)
Consists of (a)  1,755,530 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (b) 237,062 shares held by Mr. Anevski.
(9)
Consists of (a) 35,866 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, (b) 1,282 restricted stock units vesting within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (c) 38,640 shares held by Ms. Bealer.
(10)
Consists of 16,500 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022 held by Ms. Clinton.
(11)
Consists of (a) 64,137 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (b) 6,000 shares held by Dr. Cohen.
(12)
Consists of (a) 53,416 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (b) 5,000 shares held by Mr. Gordon.
(13)
Consists of 2,112 shares held by Ms. Greenbaum as of April 19, 2021.
(14)
Consists of 16,500 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022 held by Mr. Holstein.
(15)
Consists of (a) 49,100 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, (b) 1,063 restricted stock units vesting within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (c) 1,622 shares held by Mr. Livingston.
(16)
Consists of (a) 67,446 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (b) 6,000 shares held by Mr. Park.
(17)
Consists of (a)  100,725 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, (b) 231,000 shares held by Dr. Payson, (c) 305,766 shares held by Dr. Payson and Melinda B. Payson, trustees of The Norman C. and Melinda B. Payson Revocable Trust, and (d) 122,493 shares held by EVO Eagle, LLC. Dr. Payson shares voting and dispositive power over the shares held by EVO Eagle, LLC.
(18)
Consists of 3,488,992 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022 held by Mr. Schlanger.
(19)
Consists of (a) 72,300 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022 (b) 29,999 shares held by Dr. Seidenberg, (c) 204,907 shares of common stock held by The Seidenberg/Vogel Rev Trust u/a/d 3/6/03 amended and restated on 06/16/20 (the “Seidenberg Trust”), and (d) 6,473,515 aggregate shares of common stock and warrants to purchase shares of common stock held by KPCB XIII and individuals and entities associated with KPCB referred to in footnote (6) above. Dr. Seidenberg is a trustee of the Seidenberg Trust, and is a partner at KPCB. Dr. Seidenberg disclaims beneficial ownership of all shares held by KPCB XIII except to the extent of her pecuniary interest therein.
(20)
Consists of (a) 53,417 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, and (b) 3,000 shares held by Ms. Scott.
(21)
Consists of (a) 5,961,516 shares issuable upon the exercise of options within 60 days of March 28, 2022, (b) 17,970 restricted stock units vesting within 60 days of March 28, 2022 and (c) 7,699,301 shares.
 
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TRANSACTIONS WITH RELATED PERSONS
The following is a summary of transactions since January 1, 2021 to which we have been a participant in which the amount involved exceeded or will exceed $120,000, and in which any of our directors, executive officers or holders of more than 5% of any class of our capital stock at the time of such transaction, or any members of their immediate family, had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.
Employment Arrangements
We have entered into employment agreements with certain of our executive officers. For more information regarding these agreements with our named executive officers, see “Executive Compensation.”
Stock Option Grants to Directors and Executive Officers
We have granted stock options to certain of our directors and executive officers. For more information regarding the stock options and stock awards granted to our directors and named executive officers see “Executive Compensation” and “Director Compensation.”
Indemnification Agreements
We have entered into indemnification agreements with each of our directors and executive officers. The indemnification agreements and our amended and restated bylaws require us t